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Ticket prices are falling fast ahead of Super Bowl LI

Prices for Super Bowl LI tickets on the secondary market aren’t going up — they’ve slipped by 40 percent since the Patriots’ victory in the AFC Championship game on Jan. 22.
Prices for Super Bowl LI tickets on the secondary market aren’t going up — they’ve slipped by 40 percent since the Patriots’ victory in the AFC Championship game on Jan. 22.Bill Greene/Globe Staff/File

It’s getting cheaper to go to the Super Bowl at the last minute.

Prices on the the secondary market have fallen by nearly 40 percent since the New England Patriots earned their seventh trip to the Super Bowl in the Brady-Belichick era. The average price for a Super Bowl seat on TicketIQ, a New York-based ticket platform, is down to $4,400, from nearly $6,000 the day after the Patriots and Atlanta Falcons each won their conference championships. The cheapest available tickets are now selling for under $2,200, down from $3,000 a week ago.

StubHub, which does not list an average inventory price, says its cheapest tickets are also around $2,200, down from $3,800. SeatGeek’s average has dropped from $5,100 to $3,225.

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Prices nearly always dip over the two weeks ahead of the Super Bowl as more tickets hit the market and sellers feel increasing pressure to sell. As of Monday, TicketIQ had almost 2,700 tickets available. Unusally, in 2015, when the Patriots were last in the Super Bowl, demand never tapered and prices increased sharply in the final days.

Prices are falling even though there are fewer tickets available on the secondary market for this year’s Super Bowl than in previous years. The NFL launched a new program this season that sets aside more than 9,000 tickets sold in packages that include pregame parties and other specialties and sold at a premium price. For example, the most expensive NFL package, at $12,750 comes with access to the field and pre- and post-game parties.

TicketIQ chief executive Jesse Lawrence, said tickets would be much cheaper if a more typical number were available, maybe as low $800 each.

“Price is a function of supply as much as it’s a function of demand,” he said. “This year, supply is playing the big role.”

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In part, the lower demand is a result of the game’s participants, Lawrence said. The Atlanta Falcons are a lower-profile team, and, “Pats fans, as much as they don’t want to hear it, they don’t travel well,” he said. “They have Super Bowl fatigue. Poor guys.”


Adam Vaccaro can be reached at adam.vaccaro@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @adamtvaccaro.