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    Senate backs effort to restore Net neutrality rules

    Massachusetts Democratic Senator Ed Markey (right) joined fellow lawmakers at a news conference in Washington Wednesday to press the case for restoring Obama-era Net neutrality rules. With him were Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer of New York (center) and Representative Hakeem Jeffries, Democrat of New York.
    Andrew Harnik/Associated Press
    Massachusetts Democratic Senator Ed Markey (right) joined fellow lawmakers at a news conference in Washington Wednesday to press the case for restoring Obama-era Net neutrality rules. With him were Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer of New York (center) and Representative Hakeem Jeffries, Democrat of New York.

    WASHINGTON — Senate Democrats, joined by three Republicans, on Wednesday pushed through a measure intended to revive Obama-era Internet rules that ensured equal treatment for all Web traffic, though opposition in the House and at the White House seems insurmountable.

    Republicans on the short end of the 52-47 vote described the effort to reinstate so-called Net neutrality rules as ‘‘political theater’’ because the GOP-controlled House is not expected to take up the issue, and the Senate’s margin could not overcome a presidential veto.

    Democrats, however, were undeterred, saying their push would energize young voters who are tech savvy and value unfettered access to the Internet.

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    ‘‘This is a defining vote. The most important vote we’re going to have in this generation on the Internet,’’ said Democratic Senator Edward Markey of Massachusetts, who sponsored the measure.

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    At issue are rules the Federal Communications Commission repealed in December that prevented AT&T, Comcast, Verizon and other providers from interfering with Internet traffic and favoring their own sites and apps.

    Critics, including the Trump administration, said overregulation was stifling innovation, and they backed the FCC’s decision, which takes effect next month.

    Markey said Net neutrality has worked for the smallest voices and the largest, but he said Internet service providers are trying to change the rules to benefit their own interests.

    Republicans said they’re willing to work with Democrats to enshrine the principle of Net neutrality in legislation. But they wanted to also ensure that regulatory efforts don’t get in the way of innovation and quickly evolving Internet services.

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    Senator John Thune, Republican of South Dakota, said the Internet thrived long before the Obama administration stepped in with rules in 2015, and he predicted that when the FCC repeal is in place, consumers won’t notice a change in their service.

    ‘‘That’s what we’re going back to: rules that were in place for two decades under a light-touch regulatory approach that allowed the Internet to explode and prosper and grow,’’ Thune said.

    But the FCC’s move has stirred fears among consumer advocates that cable and phone giants will be free to block access to services they don’t like or to set up ‘‘fast lanes’’ for preferred services — in turn, relegating everyone else to ‘‘slow lanes.’’

    Joining all Democratic senators in voting to reverse the FCC’s action were GOP Senators Susan Collins of Maine, John Kennedy of Louisiana, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska.

    In recent months, Republicans have used the tools made available in the Congressional Review Act to overturn several environmental, health, and safety rules put into place in the final months of the Obama administration. This time, however, it was Democrats who led the effort to kill a rule supported by the Trump administration.

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    ‘‘This is our chance, our best chance to make sure the Internet stays accessible and affordable to all Americans,’’ said Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer, Democrat of New York.