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INTERNATIONAL

US, Poland sign joint document on 5G technology cooperation

The United States and Poland signed an agreement on Monday to cooperate on new 5G technology. Vice President Mike Pence and Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki signed the deal in Warsaw, where Pence is filling in for President Trump, who scrapped his trip at the last minute because of Hurricane Dorian. The signing comes amid a global battle between the United States and Huawei, of China, the world’s biggest maker of network infrastructure equipment, over network security. The agreement endorses principles developed by cybersecurity officials from dozens of countries at a summit in Prague earlier this year to counter threats and ensure the safety of next-generation mobile networks. Pence said the agreement would ‘‘set a vital example for the rest of Europe.’’ The United States has been lobbying allies to ban Huawei from 5G networks over concerns China’s government could force the company to give it access to data for cyberespionage. Huawei denies the allegation. The United States has called for an outright ban on Huawei, but European allies have balked at that. A senior Trump administration official told reporters the agreement would help ensure secure supply chains and networks and protect against unauthorized access or interference by telecommunications suppliers, some of which are controlled by ‘‘adversarial governments.’’ — ASSOCIATED PRESS

AGRICULTURE

Growers see solid cranberry harvest if weather cooperates

With summer winding down, the cranberry harvest can’t be far behind. The head of the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers’ Association, Brian Wick, said its members are largely optimistic about this year’s crop, but weather remains a variable. The USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service forecasts the total US cranberry crop to hit 9 million barrels, a 4 percent increase over 2018’s. One barrel equals 100 pounds of cranberries. In Massachusetts, the second-largest cranberry producer, behind Wisconsin, the crop is projected at 2.3 million barrels, up about 3 percent from last year. Early September is a critical period for cranberries, which need both additional moisture and cooler nights to reach full size and develop their distinctive color. While most growers deploy supplemental irrigation systems, Wick said ‘‘nothing beats a good soaking rain.’’
— ASSOCIATED PRESS

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FINANCE

Greece ends crisis-era capital controls

Greece has ended the last remaining banking restrictions imposed four years ago during a financial crisis that saw the country nearly crash out of the eurozone. The decision, announced last week, took full effect Monday as limits were lifted on international business transactions, overseas cash withdrawals, and money sent to students studying abroad. Capital controls were imposed in 2015 during a stand-off between international bailout lenders and the previous Greek government that triggered a three-week closure of banks and severe limits on cash withdrawals. Greece eventually signed a third consecutive bailout agreement, and the banking restrictions were later gradually dismantled. Conservative Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis tweeted that ‘‘the abolition of capital controls is a necessary condition to attracting investment and growth.’’ — ASSOCIATED PRESS

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ECONOMY

Federal data suggest Maine labor market growing tighter

Federal data suggest the labor market in Maine’s urban areas is growing tighter. Maine Public reports preliminary figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show the July unemployment rate in the Portland-South Portland metro area declined nearly half a percentage point, to 1.9 percent. That’s the lowest jobless rate in years in any of Maine’s three metro areas. The July unemployment rate in Lewiston-Auburn dropped two-tenths of a percent, to 2.6 percent. The Bangor metro area saw a three-tenths of a percent drop, to 2.5 percent. Maine’s statewide unemployment rate has been below 4 percent for over three years. Some businesses say they’re having trouble finding enough workers. Officials warn the shortage could persist with baby boomers reaching retirement age. — ASSOCIATED PRESS

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