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DELIVERIES

UPS to hire about 100,000 workers for the holidays

UPS said Monday it expects to hire about 100,000 seasonal workers and pay them more to handle the avalanche of packages shipped between Thanksgiving and Christmas. That’s about the same number of people that UPS hired for last year’s holiday season. UPS is also counting on automation to keep up with the constant growth in online shopping. Delivery rival FedEx and major retailers are expected to lay out their plans in the next few weeks. The volume of packages running through the UPS network roughly doubles during the holidays, compared with the rest of the year, and forecasting the right number of seasonal workers — and when to bring them on the job — can be critical. Two years ago, UPS underestimated a surge in early shopping right around Thanksgiving, and many shipments were delayed. UPS wound up spending an extra $125 million to catch up and reduce delays. — ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOFTWARE

Shopify to acquire Waltham robot maker 6 River

Canadian e-commerce software company Shopify says it will acquire Waltham-based warehouse robot maker 6 River in a deal valued at $450 million. 6 River makes robots that move through warehouses, helping workers move items from shelves to shipping areas. The company was founded by veterans of Kiva Systems, a robot company acquired by Amazon.com in 2012. — HIAWATHA BRAY

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RETAIL

Fred’s files for bankruptcy, closing all its stores

Discount retail and pharmacy chain Fred’s Inc. is filing for bankruptcy and closing its stores over the next two months. The Memphis-based company said in a statement Monday that it has filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy and has begun liquidation sales at all of its retail locations. The company said it expects to continue fulfilling prescriptions at most of its pharmacy locations, while pursuing the sale of its pharmacies. Fred’s started in 1947. Fred’s said earlier this year it was closing more than 280 underperforming stores in 13 states.
— ASSOCIATED PRESS

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AUTOMOTIVE

Volkswagen unveils new logo, new electric car

Volkswagen is unwrapping not just new models at the Frankfurt car show, but also a tweaked logo as the world’s biggest carmaker ushers in the electric era. Little-changed since World War II, the new VW emblem was uncovered atop its headquarters in Wolfsburg on Monday. Then it unveiled the VW brand’s electric-powered ID.3, the first model in an unprecedented $33 billion push to make battery-powered vehicles for the masses. — BLOOMBERG NEWS

BANKING

Michigan approves charter for credit union focusing on LGBTQ customers

Do lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people need a bank of their own? Superbia Credit Union is about to find out. Michigan on Monday approved a charter for the new financial institution designed for LGBTQ customers, clearing the way for online service to begin early in 2020. Superbia Credit Union will offer products which are often outside the scope of a more traditional lender, such as loans for transgender people in the process of transitioning, said Myles Meyers, founder of New York-based Superbia Services Inc., which created the credit union. — BLOOMBERG NEWS

RETAIL

Head of American Booksellers Association honored for resurgence of independent bookstores

Oren Teicher, who as head of the American Booksellers Association presided over a resurgence of independent bookstores, is receiving an honorary National Book Award. Teicher has won the Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community, announced Monday by the National Book Foundation. Teicher is stepping down later this year after a decade as the trade group’s CEO. He is respected among independent booksellers, who long suffered from competition with the superstore chains Barnes & Noble and Borders. Membership in the association has increased steadily since 2009, helped in part by the demise of Borders and the recent struggles of Barnes & Noble in the face of Amazon.com’s rise. The National Book Foundation presents the National Book Awards. Previous Literarian winners include Maya Angelou and Lawrence Ferlinghetti.
— ASSOCIATED PRESS

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AUTOMOTIVE

CEO of Nissan resigns

The embattled chief executive of Nissan, Hiroto Saikawa, will resign, the company said Monday, following months of speculation about his ability to manage the Japanese carmaker since it was rocked by the arrest last year of its former chairman, Carlos Ghosn. Saikawa’s resignation takes effect Sept. 16 and the company is considering a list of 10 candidates for his successor, said Masakazu Toyoda, who leads the company’s nomination committee. A decision is expected by the end of October. Nissan’s chief operating officer, Yasuhiro Yamauchi, will serve as interim CEO, Toyoda said. — NEW YORK TIMES

PHARMACEUTICALS

Amgen stock falls on results of drug to treat advanced lung cancer

More than half of patients with an advanced form of lung cancer initially responded to an experimental drug from Amgen that targets a genetic driver of the disease previously considered impervious to treatment. The stock fell 2.59 percent as the drug failed to impress investors. The highest dose of Amgen’s AMG 510 shrank tumors in seven of 13 patients and the disease was stable in the remaining six, though the benefit didn’t always last. Nine remain in the study and are still taking the daily pill. One patient’s cancer progressed after initially responding to treatment, while three others subsequently died, according to results presented at the World Conference on Lung Cancer in Barcelona. — BLOOMBERG NEWS

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AVIATION

British Airways cancels flights on Monday and Tuesday as pilots strike

British Airways canceled most flights scheduled for Monday and Tuesday after its pilots went on strike over their demand for higher pay, upending the travel plans of about 195,000 passengers. The pilots’ union said its members would not return to work for 48 hours after starting the job action at midnight Monday, prompting the latest of several cancellations that British Airways has had to manage in recent months amid a simmering labor standoff. Terminal 5 at Heathrow in London, a British Airways hub, was deserted Monday, according to British media reports, a sign that the airline had prepared for the possibility of a walkout. British Airlines said it had contacted customers two weeks ago to offer a choice of alternative flights on British Airways planes or with different airlines, or full refunds. The airline said it had canceled 1,700 flights that had been scheduled for Monday and Tuesday because of the strike, the first ever for British Airways pilots. — NEW YORK TIMES

AUTOMOTIVE

Fiat Chrysler adds more than 875,000 Ram pickups to recall over tailgates

Fiat Chrysler is adding more than 875,000 Ram pickup trucks worldwide to a series of recalls to fix tailgates that can open while the trucks are being driven. The expansion covers certain Ram 1500, 2500, and 3500 pickups from the 2013 through 2018 model years that have power locking tailgates. Affected 2015 through 2017 trucks have 8-foot beds, and the affected 2013, 2014, and 2018 trucks have beds of other sizes and were built before April 1, 2018. Fiat Chrysler says it’s not aware of any injuries or accidents caused by the problem. The company recalled about 1.1 million trucks in the United States in 2018 for the same problem, and added 410,000 in May of 2019, for a total of more than 2.4 million. Most of the recalled trucks are in the United States and Canada. — ASSOCIATED PRESS

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