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Big Data: How much ice is melting from Arctic glaciers into the ocean every year?

A glacier calves icebergs into a fjord off the Greenland ice sheet in southeastern Greenland, Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017. The Greenland ice sheet, the second largest body of ice in the world which covers roughly 80 percent of the country, has been melting and its glaciers retreating at an accelerated pace in recent years due to warmer temperatures. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
A glacier calves icebergs into a fjord off the Greenland ice sheet in southeastern Greenland, Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017. The Greenland ice sheet, the second largest body of ice in the world which covers roughly 80 percent of the country, has been melting and its glaciers retreating at an accelerated pace in recent years due to warmer temperatures. (AP Photo/David Goldman)(AP)

447 Billion tons — that, according to a new study, is how much ice is melting from Arctic glaciers into the ocean every year. Using NASA data, a team of researchers led by Jason Box, of the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, concluded that shrinking glaciers in the far north are the biggest contributor to rising sea levels. And the rate of melting in the region, Box told The Washington Post, has tripled since 1986. While the Antarctic holds more ice, its glaciers are shedding only half as much ice. But that’s small consolation; the melting in the far south is accelerating as well.

One further complication: As water warms, it expands — another driver of rising seas.