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Holy guacamole! It’s an avocado lover’s paradise: a chance to eat an avocado (for free) every day for six months and then get paid for it.

Tufts University is pairing with three other universities — Loma Linda University, Pennsylvania State University, and University of California, Los Angeles — to evaluate the effects of avocados on a person’s body-fat levels.

A total of 1,000 participants (250 at each campus) will be enrolled in the “Habitual Diet and Avocado Trial,” which began enrolling participants in June, according to its record on ClinicalTrials.gov.

Those chosen for the study will eat one avocado every day for six months and be evaluated over the course of one screening visit, between eight and 15 study visits, four 24-hour dietary recalls, and two abdominal MRI scans, the Tufts research group wrote on its study website. Participants will get $25 for their screening visit and an additional $1,045 at the end of the study.

The clinical trial record states participants will be evaluated “on established health parameters, including visceral adiposity, hepatic lipid content, markers of metabolic syndrome and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP)” when compared with a person’s regular diet.

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Participants will be broken into two groups: an “experimental” group who will eat the daily avocados and a “control” group who will continue their usual diets.

Have no fear — the “control” group “will be provided up to 24 avocados upon study completion.”

But don’t count your avocados before they ripen. Like any study, there are a variety of qualifications you must meet.

Participants are required to be 25 years or older with a body mass index over 25 for women and over 27 for men, and they must be able to complete an MRI. Participants also can’t have a known chronic disease, or be pregnant, lactating, or planning to become pregnant.

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And the biggest catch for avocado addicts: You can’t already be eating more than two avocados a month.

So if you’re in a serious relation-chip with the green fruit, but don’t already eat it frequently, guac and roll over to this study to find out more.


Felicia Gans can be reached at felicia.gans@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @FeliciaGans.