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Recipe for Crustless Swiss chard pie

Crustless Swiss chard pie

FOOD STYLING BY SHERYL JULIAN AND VALERIE RYAN; PHOTOS BY DINA RUDICK/GLOBE STAFF

Crustless Swiss chard pie

Makes one 8-inch square or round

Both rainbow chard, with its colorful stems, or the more traditional white-stemmed chard are great for this crustless pie sent in by Jeanne M. Woodes of Wellfleet. The soft, eggy quiche-like custard bakes with the dark green leaves, which are scented with fresh thyme and covered with Parmesan. “Cut into squares for appetizers or wedges for pie,” says Woodes. Chard can be sandy. Rinse the leaves well in a deep bowl of cold water.

Butter (for the dish)
2tablespoons vegetable oil
1onion, chopped
2cloves garlic, finely chopped
2bunches Swiss chard, stemmed, leaves coarsely chopped
1teaspoon salt
teaspoon cayenne pepper
4eggs
1cup whole milk
¼cup flour
Pinch of ground nutmeg
3sprigs fresh thyme, leaves removed
½cup grated Parmesan

1. Set the oven at 375 degrees. Butter a deep 8-inch round or square baking dish.

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2. In a large skillet over medium heat, heat the oil. Add the onion and garlic. Cook, stirring often, for 8 minutes. Add the Swiss chard. With tongs, toss the greens and onions until well mixed. Add salt and cayenne pepper. Cover and cook for 5 minutes, or until the chard is wilted.

3. In a blender, combine the eggs, milk, flour, nutmeg, and a pinch of salt. Blend until smooth, scraping down the sides of the container.

4. With tongs, remove the chard from the skillet, leaving any liquid in the pan. Spread the greens evenly in the baking dish. Sprinkle with thyme. Pour the egg mixture over the greens. With a spatula, move the greens around to make sure the batter is completely incorporated into the mixture. Sprinkle cheese on top.

5. Bake for 40 minutes or until the pie is set in the center. Let it settle for 5 minutes. Cut into small pieces to serve as an appetizer, or wedges to serve as a brunch or side dish. Adapted from Jeanne M. Woodes

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