Latest Health & Wellness headlines

This is an undated photo of sick baby Charlie Gard provided by his family, taken at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London. The parents of a critically ill infant Monday July 24, 2017 withdrew their court fight seeking permission to take the child to the United States for medical treatment. Chris Gard and Connie Yates wept as their attorney revealed the results of brain scans. The 11-month-old has a rare genetic condition, and his parents fought hard to receive an experimental treatment. Doctors said it wouldn't help and contended Charlie should be allowed to die peacefully. (Family of Charlie Gard via AP)

Judge: Baby Charlie Gard will end life in hospice, not home

The court the child’s parents and the hospital that has been treating him until noon Thursday to come to terms on an end-of-life care plan for the infant’s final hours or days.

Chris Gard, the father of critically ill baby Charlie Gard, finishes reading out a statement flanked by mother Connie Yates, right, at the end of their case at the High Court in London, Monday, July 24, 2017. The parents of critically ill baby Charlie Gard dropped their legal bid Monday to send him to the United States for an experimental treatment after new medical tests. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

Charlie Gard’s parents ask court to let him die at home

They would like “a few days of tranquility” at home with the 11-month-old before he passes away.

Girl’s HIV infection seems under control without AIDS drugs

more evidence that early treatment can occasionally cause a long remission that, if it lasts, would be a form of cure.

Connie Yates (left) and Chris Gard arrived at the High Court in London today.

Charlie Gard’s parents withdraw appeal to treat the infant

Their lawyer says Chris Gard and Connie Yates are withdrawing their appeal to court orders saying Charlie’s treatment should end.

Medical marijuana is rolled into a joint in Belfast, Maine.

Grass for trash: Marijuana business offers free weed on cleanup day

Dennis Meehan, the owner of Summit Medical Marijuana, offered residents who collected trash in Gardiner Saturday some free flower.

(FILES) This photo taken on August 25, 2010 in Johannesburg shows former South Africa's President Nelson Mandela in a handout photograph released by the Nelson Mandela Foundation. Nelson Mandela

Book about Nelson Mandela’s medical treatment stirs dispute

The retired doctor, Vejay Ramlakan, said the Mandela family had requested that the book be written.

Charlie Gard protesters rally as hospital reports threats

Activists gathered outside the London court where legal proceedings will resume Monday with new medical evidence expected.

NYC warns about possible rabid squirrel after five people bitten

There were five reports of people being bitten by an unusually aggressive squirrel in Prospect Park in a span of a few days last week.

For 1st time, over half of people with HIV taking AIDS drugs

AIDS deaths are also now close to half of what they were in 2005.

Jake Martinez, who has epilepsy, looks on as he stands next to his medication at his home in Murray, Utah. While Republicans in Congress failed this week to craft a new health care plan, they did succeed in shaking the confidence of those who rely on the act the most.

Health plan’s fall brings dread for ‘Obamacare’ recipients

One American was able to afford her toddler’s latest heart operation. Another had the means to go back to college to pursue her dreams.

Officials: Boy, 10, among youngest victims of opioid crisis

Prosecutors in Florida believe a 10-year-old boy who died with the painkiller fentanyl in his system is among the state’s youngest victims of the opioid crisis.

Terminally ill British man seeks right to die

Noel Conway argues that Britain’s ban on assisted suicide is incompatible with protections of human rights

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) at the Capitol Thursday. MUST CREDIT: Katherine Frey, The Washington Post.

CBO delays analysis of latest health care bill

There’s another possible delay to the Senate’s consideration of a GOP bill to repeal and replace the Obama-era health care law.

epa06083552 Republican Senator from Texas John Cornyn attends the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Christopher Wray's nomination to be Director of the FBI, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, USA, 12 July 2017. Christopher Wray was nominated by US President Donald J. Trump to be the Director of the FBI after Trump fired former Director James Comey. EPA/MICHAEL REYNOLDS

No. 2 GOP senator expects health bill vote once McCain returns

Senator John Cornyn said he expects a vote on the GOP health bill once John McCain returns following surgery.

House passes defense bill without base closures

The bill declares climate change a threat to national security and, demands rigorous oversight of the Pentagon’s cyber operations.

epa06084399 The parents of Charlie Gard, Connie Yates (L) and Chris Gard (C), arrive at the High Court with a spokesperson in London, Britain, 13 July 2017. Connie Yates and Chris Gard have delivered a petition to Great Ormond Street Hospital calling for Charlie to be allowed to travel and to receive treatment in the US. The High Court is expected to make a decision on the case later this Thursday, 13 July. EPA/ANDY RAIN

US doctor says treatment ‘worth trying’ in UK sick baby case

The specialist told Britain’s High Court that nucleoside therapy may help Charlie Gard, the child at the heart of a legal battle between his parents and a London hospital.

In this July 9, 2015, photo, provided by Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp., human T cells belonging to cancer patients arrive at Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.'s Morris Plains, N.J., facility. This laboratory is where the T cells of cancer patients are processed and turned into super cells as part of a new gene therapy-based cancer treatment Novartis is a part of. (Brent Stirton/Courtesy of Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. via AP)

FDA panel endorses potential first US gene therapy

A panel of cancer experts has voted in favor of a leukemia treatment which could be the first gene therapy available in the US.

UK’s May orders probe into contaminated blood scandal

Contaminated blood was used to treat thousands of people in the 1970s and ‘80s, killing at least 2,400.

Measles has killed 35 children in Europe

The World Health Organization calls the deaths an “unacceptable tragedy” given that the disease can be prevented through a vaccine.

Chris Gard and Connie Yates, the parents of terminally ill toddler Charlie Gard, listened as a family friend addressed the media outside High Court in London on Monday.

UK court sets new hearing in case of terminally ill baby

The parents of 11-month-old Charlie Gard will present fresh evidence that their son should receive experimental treatment.

Nation’s first opioid court aims to keep users alive

It became clear that Buffalo’s ordinary drug treatment court was no match for the heroin and painkiller crisis.

Foreign doctors deem ill Chinese Nobel laureate OK to travel

The specialists differed with Chinese experts who said a medical evacuation would be unsafe.

UK official says government has no role in Charlie Gard case

Justice Secretary David Lidington said the decision on the 11-month-old boy will be made by judge.

Georgia health commissioner named CDC director in Atlanta

Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald is an OB-GYN and has been head of the Georgia Department of Public Health since 2011.

Hospital: Chinese Nobel Peace laureate’s health worsens

Chinese Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo’s health is further deteriorating as his liver function worsens and abdominal fluid accumulates, a friend and the hospital that is treating him said, adding to concerns about the long-term prognosis for the country’s best-known political prisoner.

Man charged with throwing bedbugs at Maine municipal office

Authorities say the man had complained to the code enforcement office about bedbugs at his former apartment and left.

Veteran activist Albert Ho (C) prepares to host a parcel to terminally-ill Chinese Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo (pictured on parcel) at the General Post Office in Hong Kong on July 5, 2017. The Chinese hospital caring for cancer-stricken Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo has decided to invite US, German and other foreign experts to treat him in China following international pressure to let him go abroad. / AFP PHOTO / Anthony WALLACEANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images

China invites foreign experts to treat Nobel laureate Liu

China made the invitation amid international criticism of Beijing’s handling of Liu’s case and calls for him to be allowed to be treated abroad.

Pete Frates (left) with his wife Julie and daughter Lucy.

Decision due Friday on fund to pay health care for ALS patients

The Pete Frates Home Health Initiative is close to helping an ALS patient, and Frates himself has not been ruled out as a recipient.

Doctors worked in makeshift tents last month to treat victims with acute diarrhea in Sudan’s White Nile State. The government denies the country is suffering from a cholera outbreak although doctors and diplomats have reported confirmed cases, and hundreds have died since late May.

Sudanese doctors urge measures against cholera outbreak

Doctors also urged delaying the start of the school year, although authorities say the situation is under control.

In this April 5, 2017, file photo, Chicago Police Department Superintendent Eddie Johnson speaks during a news conference in Chicago on April 5.

Chicago police will team up with federal agents to fight gun violence

President Trump tweeted Friday morning that ‘‘crime and killings in Chicago have reached such epidemic proportions that I am sending in Federal help.’’

Pastor to face trial in granddaughter’s faith healing death

The pastor of a fundamentalist congregation that eschews modern medicine will stand trial on a charge he should have alerted authorities when his 2-year-old granddaughter was dying of pneumonia last year, a Pennsylvania judge ruled Wednesday.

Kenya 1st in Africa to use generic of current AIDS drug

Kenya is the first country in Africa to introduce a generic version of the current drug of choice for people living with HIV, officials said Wednesday.

Merck says new type of cholesterol drug worked in big study

The result was a welcome surprise after three previous experimental drugs of the same type had failed.

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JULY 14: Pedestrians walk by a sign that is displayed in front of the Genetech headquarters July 14, 2008 in South San Francisco, California. Biothech firm Genentech will release its second quarter earnings today and will be relying on the popularity of its cancer drug Avasatin to boost profits. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Drug shows promise against vision-robbing disease in seniors

An experimental drug is showing promise against an untreatable eye disease that blinds older adults — and intriguingly, it seems to work in patients who carry a particular gene flaw that fuels the damage to their vision.

No longer the hot new thing? Teen vaping falls, study says

Teen vaping, which has been skyrocketing, fell dramatically last year in the United States.

In this frame grab, a man comforted his child as she was treated for possible food poisoning in Hassan Sham U2 camp.

Iraq: Food poisoning strikes hundreds at camp for displaced

Iraqi Health Minister Adila Hamoud said that 752 people in the camp became ill following a Monday night iftar — the meal breaking the dawn-to-dusk fast by Muslims during the holy month of Ramadan.

FILE - This Friday, Sept. 6, 2013, file photo shows a drone at a testing site in Lincoln, Neb. An experimental study in Sweden suggests drones equipped with heart defibrillators could help with response times for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Drones arrived at the scene of cardiac arrests almost 17 minutes faster on average than ambulances in a study in rural Sweden. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)

Drones with defibrillators could soon fly to the rescue in cardiac arrests

It sounds futuristic: drones carrying heart defibrillators swooping in to help bystanders revive people stricken by cardiac arrest.

A doctor tended to a small girl staying at an Iraqi camp for displaced persons who may have suffered food poisoning.

Hundreds sickened by mass food poisoning in Iraqi camp

At least two people died, Iraq’s health minister said.

Obesity rising in nations rich and poor, especially in children

The global obesity problem now affects 1 in 10 people in the world, according to a new study.

Missouri lawmakers return for special session on abortion

Governor Eric Greitens wants more abortion restrictions and seeks to undo a St. Louis ordinance that bans abortion discrimination.

A NaloxBox installed at Amos House, which provides drug recovery services, in Providence, RI.

R.I. group wants to make drug overdose boxes as common as defibrillators

The NaloxBox is meant to give bystanders in public areas easy and quick access to the opioid overdose antidote naloxone.

Zika birth defects in US territories similar to other places

A new report shows Zika birth defects were about the same in Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories as in other places hit by the epidemic.

Missouri governor calls special session on abortion

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens said Wednesday he is calling lawmakers back to the Capitol to work on abortion policies, including looking at a St. Louis ordinance that bans discrimination based on abortions and pregnancies.

Study finds pregnancy seems safe for breast cancer survivors

A study gives reassuring news for breast cancer survivors who want to have children. Those who later became pregnant were no more likely to have their cancer come back than those who did not have a baby.

Quickly reporting cancer complications may boost survival

A study found that the reports surprisingly improved survival — by almost half a year, longer than many new cancer drugs do.

Cholera-infected Yemenis receive treatment at a hospital inSana’a in late May.

3,000 to 5,000 new cholera cases in Yemen each day, says UN

A cholera outbreak is spreading quickly in war-ravaged Yemen, the UN children’s agency said on Saturday.

Bacteria thwarted attempt at anti-HIV gel

Researchers have found a kind of reproductive tract bacteria breaks down protective medication.

A Massachusetts State Police trooper displayed a dosage of Naloxone during a training session with his K-9 Drako in Revere, Mass.

A tool to protect police dogs in drug raids from overdosing

Massachusetts State Police started carrying naloxone for their K-9s in March.

In the poll, only 8 percent said the Senate should pass the House health care bill as it is.

Poll finds most think GOP health bill is a far cry from Trump promises

President Trump has called the House-passed health care bill a “great plan,” but a new poll finds that 3 out of 4 people in the United States do not believe it fulfills most of his promises.

Kansas lawmakers OK new abortion rule with font requirement

Kansas legislators approved a new requirement for abortion providers Tuesday that calls for them to disclose doctors’ histories to their patients — and specifies that it be done on white paper in black, 12-point Times New Roman type.