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Milton Academy scandal inspires TV movie

Vanessa Marano, Max Lloyd-Jones in “Restless Virgins.”

Sergei Backlakov

Vanessa Marano, Max Lloyd-Jones in “Restless Virgins.”

A few things you should know about the new Lifetime movie “Restless Virgins.” 1. It was inspired by the 2005 Milton Academy student sex scandal. 2. It premieres Saturday night. 3. It was executive produced by Brookline-bred Michael Roiff, who also worked on the Keri Russell movie “Waitress”; last year’s “Save the Date,” which starred Allison Brie and Lizzy Caplan; and “In Your Eyes,” a yet-to-be-released mystery-romance written by Joss Whedon that filmed in New Hampshire last year.

The script for the Lifetime movie is based on the book “Restless Virgins” by Abigail Jones and Marissa Miley, two Milton grads from the late 1990s, who interviewed students from Milton’s class of 2005 before writing about the culture of sex at their alma mater. The idea for the book was sparked by the scandal which involved a 15-year-old girl engaging in oral sex with several hockey players on campus.

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Roiff tells us that Milton Academy had nothing to do with the production of the movie (no surprise there), and that the film alters the real-life controversy enough to be considered fiction.

“Virgins” is described by Lifetime as the story of “a world where privileged teens, thriving on exploitation and manipulation, run wild at a New England prep school. The film follows Emily, a scholarship student and the editor of the school newspaper, who struggles with the daily stresses of high school and adolescence: fitting in, getting into the right college, and trying to find love. But when Emily discovers five senior members of the lacrosse team made a sex tape with a classmate, she blows the lid off the controversy by releasing the tape virally.”

The movie, which was shot in Vancouver, features Vanessa Marano and Max Lloyd-Jones, both of the ABC Family show “Switched at Birth,” as well as Timothy Busfield, of “The West Wing” and “Thirtysomething.”

Roiff joked to us via e-mail that Milton Academy was actually his rival school; he went to Noble and Greenough. “I even scored a goal against them in 8th grade soccer . . . but I guess that’s neither here nor there. . .,” he wrote. Roiff tells us that we can expect to hear news about the release of “In Your Eyes” soon. We’re hoping there will be a nice New England premiere of that one, perhaps near Amherst, N.H., where Roiff and his crew shot scenes.

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