Names

Names

Part of the Hub’s Hollywood past up for auction

Steve McQueen in "The Thomas Crown Affair."
Steve McQueen in "The Thomas Crown Affair."

There have been plenty of bad movies shot in Boston. A few egregious examples of late include “The Game Plan” starring Dwayne Johnson, “The Box” starring Cameron Diaz and Frank Langella, and the utterly forgettable “My Best Friend’s Girl,” starring Kate Hudson and Dane Cook.

But it wasn’t always this way. One of the first — and best — movies made in Massachusetts was the 1968 classic “The Thomas Crown Affair” starring the king of cool himself, actor Steve McQueen. Now, Boston-based RR Auction is selling McQueen’s annotated script for the film.

It contains 19 pages with McQueen’s own handwritten reminders to himself, including stage directions like “Sandy looking at ball” and “Look at Sandy,” and notes related to his character, including “should have something else . . . stage is set only for reaction — a little of the believability is lost.”

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The 109-page script is in a custom, leatherbound binder with “Thomas Crown and Company, Steve McQueen” gilt-stamped on the front. The auction house estimates bidding for the item could top $50,000.

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In the film, directed by Norman Jewison, McQueen plays sophisticated millionaire Thomas Crown, who masterminds a bank heist of more than $2 million. Faye Dunaway costars as the sultry insurance investigator who’s on the trail of the money.

The movie was filmed in and around Boston. Locations included the Second Harrison Gray Otis House at 85 Mt. Vernon St., which serves as Crown’s residence, while the bank robbery was shot at the former Beverly National Bank. Alert viewers will also glimpse the Myopia Hunt Club in South Hamilton, the Belmont Country Club, Crane Beach in Ipswich, Copp’s Hill Cemetery in the North End, and Acorn Street on Beacon Hill, where McQueen and Dunaway’s characters share a memorable kiss.