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The new trailer for Made-in-Mass. ‘Slender Man’ is creepy

Sylvain White, director of “Slender Man.”
Dan Steinberg/AP/file
Sylvain White, director of “Slender Man.”

There’s a trailer out for “Slender Man,” a horror film that was shot in Massachusetts last year.

The movie — which stars Jaz Sinclair and Joey King — is inspired by the creepy fictional character, which started as a meme and wound up inspiring a real-life stabbing in Wisconsin in 2014.

Based on the trailer, the film, directed by Sylvain White, has the tone of a classic horror film, and includes scenic views of creepy New England graveyards.

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White, whose resume includes “Stomp the Yard” and episodes of “The Americans,” “Hawaii Five-0,” and “Major Crimes,” shot scenes in Shirley, Ayer, and at New England Studios in Devens. The movie is set for release May 18.

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Massachusetts, with its tax credit for film projects, has hosted a number of scary productions over the past few years. The Stephen King-inspired Hulu series “Castle Rock” was shot in Mass., as was “Cadaver,” a thriller about a woman who works in a morgue, starring “Pretty Little Liars” actress Shay Mitchell and directed by Diederik Van Rooijen. “Cadaver” is expected out in August.

Massachusetts also hosted the filming of “Thoroughbreds,” a dark comedy-thriller about two Connecticut teens who plot a murder. That one is out March 9.

Jamie Merz, location manager on “Slender Man,” who also co-owns the local company Good Natured Dog Productions, spoke generally about Massachusetts as a place for horror, and said that scary projects are often set here because the scenery can be, well, scary.

“A lot of it would have to do with the history of the area,” he said. “New England is a historical region, which means it has older things, which can be creepy.”

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He added, “we also take care of our structures. We have state hospitals that are super old and antiquated, and we have graveyards. . . . We have a lot of different looks.”