Names

NAMES

Matt Damon showed up to the World Economic Forum wearing another man’s clothes

US actor Matt Damon and his wife Luciana Barroso arrive for the world premiere of Disney's "Mary Poppins Returns" at the Dolby theatre in Hollywood on November 29, 2018. (Photo by VALERIE MACON / AFP)VALERIE MACON/AFP/Getty Images
AFP/Getty Images
Matt Damon and his wife, Luciana Barroso

Matt Damon was wearing another man’s clothes when he arrived at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on Tuesday.

Damon fell victim to the perils of air travel, telling a panel hosted by Bloomberg that he was forced to don the duds of his Water.org cofounder, Gary White, after Swiss Air misplaced his luggage.

“The relationship has developed to the point where I’m wearing Gary’s clothes right now, because Swiss Air lost my bags,” Damon said, when asked about his relationship with White, with whom he cofounded Water.org in 2009. “So we’ve come a long way.”

Advertisement

Baggage mishaps aside, Damon talked about why he has made worldwide access to safe drinking water his primary philanthropic focus.

Get The Weekender in your inbox:
The Globe's top picks for what to see and do each weekend, in Boston and beyond.
Thank you for signing up! Sign up for more newsletters here

“It underlines everything,” Damon said. “All these issues of extreme poverty are affected by it. It really touches everything. You can’t solve any of these problems we’re talking about today — gender equality, climate change, all of these things — water touches all of them.”

Dedham, Massachusetts - 7/23/2015 - Boston 2024 committee chairman Steve Pagliuca speaks during a debate to address the proposed Boston Olympics in Dedham, Massachusetts,July 23, 2015. (Keith Bedford/Globe Staff)
Keith Bedford/Globe Staff/file
Steve Pagliuca

In addition to Damon, a who’s who of the Boston area’s biggest names in business and education planned to attend the summit. Celtics co-owner and Bain Capital co-chairman Stephen Pagliuca was scheduled to make the trek along with six Bain & Co. leaders, and at least five higher-ups at Boston Consulting Group were on the guest list, including chairman Hans-Paul Bürkner. In the education realm, the forum was expected to welcome at least 10 Harvard-affiliated guests, including Harvard University president Lawrence Bacow. And MIT and Yale had at least seven university-affiliated attendees each on the RSVP list, including Yale president Peter Salovey and MIT president L. Rafael Raif.

2/09/11 - Boston, MA - Bank of America's chief marketing officer, Anne Finucane, has been working quietly behind the scenes to rebuild the bank's reputation in the wake of the financial crisis and rising complaints about big banks. Story slugged: 13finucane. Story by Todd Wallack. Dina Rudick/Globe Staff. Library Tag 02132011 Money & Careers
Dina Rudick/Globe staff/file
Anne Finucane

Other notables with local ties scheduled to make the trip to Switzerland included chairman, president, and CEO of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company Roger Crandall, Bank of America vice chairman Anne Finucane, and Iron Mountain president and CEO William Meaney.

Several weighty topics were on the agenda at the WEF on Tuesday, but in one case a soundbite got the attention. Former Secretary of State John Kerry, taking part in a CNBC panel, was asked by a moderator if he had a message for President Trump, who canceled his trip to Davos because of the government shutdown. After a couple of false starts, the former senator from Massachusetts boiled his message down to one word: “Resign.”

Advertisement

Several other events were scheduled for Tuesday afternoon. Former Harvard assistant professor and New York Times best-selling author Amy Cuddywas on a panel about violence against women that also included Nobel Peace Prize winner Denis Mukwege, and Microsoft founder Bill Gatesjoined a panel examining how to build improved financial architecture to support global health initiatives.

One Boston-based businessman making waves at Davos wasn’t even at the summit.

Seth Klarman, a billionaire investor who runs the Boston-based Baupost Group and has been called the “Oracle of Boston,” sent a letter to investors — including overseers of Harvard’s and Yale’s endowments — that raises “a huge red flag about global social tensions, rising debt levels and receding American leadership,” according to a Tuesday article from The New York Times.

The Times story predicted that Klarman’s letter would be the talk of the town, writing that it was “likely to add to the hand-wringing that typically takes place in Davos during a week of panels and conversation over Champagne and canapés.”

Kevin Slane can be reached at kevin.slane@globe.com.