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All good things must come to an end.

After 67 years of laughs, MAD Magazine will halt publication of new content and vanish from newsstands after its next two issues are released.

Fans mourned the demise of the legendary humor publication, including Marblehead native Rob Delaney, who posted a string of tweets detailing his first experience with the satirical magazine.

“. . . MAD Magazine showed me what humor is for and thus gave me my life’s direction,” wrote the comedian, who co-wrote and starred in the British television series “Catastrophe.” “I used my allowance of $1.50 to buy each issue, which in 1987 cost $1.35 [(cheap!) it said next to the price].”

Delaney went on to tell the story of a visit he made to the magazine’s headquarters in 1987. He was 10 years old, and was accompanied by his 5-year-old sister and his parents.

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Through a stroke of luck, they met artist Al Jaffee and were given the chance to meet the magazine’s publisher, Bill Gaines

“We were ushered into his office and beheld the man himself. He had long white hair with brown barrettes holding it back,” Delaney detailed. “He and my dad talked a lot about [sculptor] Auguste Bartholdi, as I recall. That day remains one of the great memories of my life.”

The decision to shut down MAD followed a series of other shakeups at DC Entertainment. In June, the company shut down its imprint Vertigo, which for 26 years provided readers with adult-themed comics. The company is also reportedly rethinking some of its other imprints, according to publishers Jim Lee and Dan DiDio, who were speaking at New York Comic Con.

Delaney wasn’t the only celebrity to express his grief about MAD. “Weird Al” Yankovic, who became the magazine’s first guest editor in 2015, tweeted, “I am profoundly sad to hear that after 67 years, MAD Magazine is ceasing publication. I can’t begin to describe the impact it had on me as a young kid — it’s pretty much the reason I turned out weird. Goodbye to one of the all-time greatest American institutions. #ThanksMAD.”

The publication was founded in 1952 as a comic book. In 1955, it switched to a magazine format. Former editor Allie Goertz, who resigned last month, lamented the magazine’s fate but noted that vintage issues with new covers will still be released. 

“MAD is an institution with such a rich history,” Goertz tweeted. “It informed just about every comedian and writer I (and probably you) look up to.”


Chris Triunfo can be reached at christian.triunfo@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @triunfo_chris.