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    Fashion

    Born in Southie, boutique follows clients to suburbs

    Ku De Ta opened earlier this month in Dedham’s Legacy Place. The original shop opened in South Boston 11 years ago.
    Melissa Ostrow
    Ku De Ta opened earlier this month in Dedham’s Legacy Place. The original shop opened in South Boston 11 years ago.

    Dedham’s Legacy Place is home to a number of national chains like Amazon Books, Athleta, Sephora, and a spacious Whole Foods. But now it’s going local, with women’s boutique Ku De Ta.

    The South Boston shop, run by friends Nicole Cronin and Heather O’Connell, focuses on designer brands at modest prices: Alex and Ani, Free People, Joe’s Jeans, Mother Denim.

    Cronin opened the original shop in Southie 11 years ago, playing on the French phrase “coup d’état.”

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    “Our tagline was ‘A fashion revolution starts here,’ ” Cronin says. She lived in South Boston at the time and noted the lack of shopping options then.

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    “I thought: Someone has to take a chance here. There are so many girls like me who just want to grab a top and go out for the night. I got a lot of support from the South Boston community,” she says.

    She hopes the same is true in Dedham, because many of her customers have since moved to the ’burbs. It opened in mid-November.

    “A lot of the women who shopped in the city have moved on. They’re coming in and saying, ‘Oh my God, I’m so happy to see you again!’ ” Cronin says.

    In addition to attractively priced denim — the shop is known for its $109 Rolla’s jeans — Ku De Ta hosts ladies’ night out parties. The two-hour private shopping soiree comes with 20 percent discounts, wine (of course), and free appetizers, plus styling advice.

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    “We always give honest feedback,’’ she says. “You don’t want to convince a customer to buy something. They’ll get home; they won’t like it; and they won’t come back.”

    Cronin also prides herself on helping shoppers retain individuality. Ku De Ta only orders six of every item, so the chances of bumping into someone with the same outfit at a party are slim.

    “It makes us different from cookie-cutter stores.’’ Cronin says.

    Kara Baskin can be reached at kara.baskin@globe.com.