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Examiner

Massachusetts college graduates will be in short supply, report says

A recent report from the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education says we’ll be lacking college degrees, threatening the state’s economy.

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A recent report from the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education says college grads will be in short supply in the future, threatening the state’s economy.

65% — Percentage of jobs nationwide that are projected to require some college education by 2020 . . .

AND THE PERCENTAGES IN SELECT JOB MARKETS:

> Top 5

76% in District of Columbia

74% in Minnesota

74% in Colorado

72% in Massachusetts

72% in North Dakota

> Bottom 5

55% in West Virginia

56% in Louisiana

58% in Tennessee

59% in Arkansas

61% in Mississippi

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19% of jobs in Massachusetts will require at least a master’s degree by 2020; the national number is 11%

55,000-65,000

Estimated minimum shortfall of new associate’s and bachelor’s degrees from Massachusetts’s public campuses to meet employers’ needs by 2025

WHY ARE DEGREES FROM PUBLIC COLLEGES IMPORTANT?

9 out of 10 students from public campuses remain in the state one year

after graduation; grads from private schools are more likely to leave

+31% — Percentage increase in Massachusetts high school graduates 1997-2008

-9% — Percentage decrease predicted 2009-2020

33% — Percentage of college-bound Massachusetts high school graduates who pick out-of-state schools; the state ranks 29th in the nation in retention of its grads

27% — Percentage of current Massachusetts public university graduates who get bachelor’s degrees in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and health care fields; the report says many more are needed

Sources: Massachusetts Department of Higher Education, “Degrees of Urgency,” October 2014; Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, “Recovery,” June 2013