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    Style Watch

    A Wayland living room goes from fussy to fabulous

    Pops of color liven up a sophisticated neutral color scheme.

    jessica delaney

    Drawn to her skill with light colors and coastal atmosphere, a Wayland couple called on Concord-based designer Meredith Rodday to transform their home from overdecorated showpiece to casual but polished family oasis. “It was covered in heavy florals, yellow wallpaper, and taffeta balloon drapery that could double as a wedding dress,” Rodday says of the house. Benjamin Moore Navajo White, a warm, creamy hue, ties the family room to the formal living room. Rodday went neutral with the major elements, including the linen-upholstered sofa, silky striated rug, and new Carrara marble fireplace surround, while pulling colors from the artwork to make the room sing.

    1. The Arteriors oak side table with oxidized-iron top and base introduces a rustic earthiness, while the hand-painted Jana Bek Design lamp adds an artistic touch.

    2. The leafy vine drapery pattern, “Novella,” by Massachusetts textile designer Ellisha Alexina, is bold but not overwhelming. “It needed to stand up to the art without dominating,” Rodday says.

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    3. The throw pillows — indigo windowpane check, lilac paisley, and tobacco leather — tie into colors around the room.

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    4. The polished-nickel Visual Comfort chandelier is “a statement piece, but see-through, so it doesn’t block the artwork,” Rodday says.

    5. An oil painting by Peter Batchelder from Powers Gallery in Acton inspired the color scheme.

    6. Armchairs by McGee & Co. add another earthy element. “The texture of the wood brings in warmth and reinforces the casual vibe,” Rodday says.

    7. The oversize navy grass-cloth-covered cocktail table anchors the seating area. Says Rodday, “The room is large, so we needed a strong focal point.”