Magazine

Comments

Letters to the editor of the Boston Globe Magazine

Readers write in about gender roles, Dinner with Cupid, and more.

Mismatched Tastes

I was distressed to see that a professional young woman does not want to see a young man again because “he reads a lot . . . and makes homemade pasta” (Dinner with Cupid, October 28). To me, these are great credentials, but we all have different tastes. C’est la vie.

Robin Stein Newtonville

Challenging Stereotypes

Traditional roles for couples are not outdated, they are just one choice of many now available (“Making It Work,” October 28). We are no longer forced into male breadwinner, female homemaker roles. Couples are not necessarily female/male anymore, either. The good news is that couples can choose breadwinner/homemaker roles, breadwinner/breadwinner roles, or some other mix that works for their abilities and desires. But, don’t reject traditional roles: Millennia of experience suggest that they work pretty well. Telling people that they must reject traditional roles is no less a tyranny than forcing them into traditional roles.

Steve Watson Lynnfield

Interesting article. This is my life. I have three boys (now 21, 17, 14). When I had my first son, my husband stayed home with him because I had a college degree and we knew I’d earn more money over time and carried life insurance. The guilt was always there. When I would get home from work my husband would be exhausted so I was on. I’d cook dinner, [and handle] baths, laundry, dishes, lunch the next day, all social events, finances, and more. This was 21 years ago — we were ahead of our time. But thank goodness we stayed our course. My husband developed lymphoma and died before the youngest turned 7. [Kara Baskin’s] article reminds me that we all need to be more accepting of everyone. It’s lonely doing it alone. Be supportive of the dads and moms regardless of the role.

Adrienne Paglia-Jones Natick

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Women and Power

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How come none of the women pictured on pages 28 through 31 of the Globe Magazine from October 28 (“The Top 100 Women-Led Businesses in Massachusetts”) has any gray hair? Is it not possible for a woman with gray hair to be a successful leader and role model? Are women in important positions required to try to look younger?

Lisa Dames Roslindale

CONTACT US: Write to magazine@globe.com or The Globe Magazine/Comments, 1 Exchange Place, Suite 201, Boston, MA 02109-2132. Comments are subject to editing.