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Style Watch

A designer new to Boston makes the most of a small rental in an old church

An armchair bought with winnings from “Wheel of Fortune” is a treasured piece incorporated into the decor.

(Joyelle West)

Designer and architect Taryn Bone moved from Los Angeles to Boston late last year after her husband (and high school sweetheart) scored a job at Amazon. Bone, founder of Bone Collective Studio, grew up in Missouri and joined the Army Reserve at age 17 to pay for college. “I got deployed within six months,” she recalls of her service in Iraq. “I realized quickly that life is short.” She later served a tour in Kuwait. Bone and her husband now lease a small unit in The Lucas, a Gothic-style church turned luxury condo building in the South End. “I love the mix of old and new,” Bone says. Her favorite part is the window. “The middle panel opens just enough to let in air,” she says. “It’s been open since April.”

1 Bone bought the armchair with winnings from an appearance on Wheel of Fortune in 2010. “It cost less than $1,000, but at the time I could only afford Ikea and Target,” says the designer. “I’ll never part with it.”

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2 Plants from neighborhood shop Niche helped Bone survive her first New England winter. “The pothos is perfect for the large planter,” she says. “It keeps growing and vining down.”

3 The wood frame of the sofa lends an architectural feel. Bone says, “It’s like the upholstery is dropped in.” The open base of the coffee table keeps the space airy, while its round shape makes it accessible from every seat.

4 A gallery wall of small works includes two pieces picked up on trips to Italy and Spain. “It’s my first time mixing different types of frames,” says Bone. “It’s a looser vibe.”

5 The textile is the work of Canadian fiber artist Nadège Roscoe-Rumjahn of La Douzaine, a neighborhood friend who recently moved back to Montreal. “She creates drawings and weavings,” Bone says.

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6 Bone likens the rug, which features geometric shapes in desert hues, to a piece of art. “A client who is a very colorful woman helped me get more comfortable with using color,” she says. “It makes me so happy.”


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