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Former Boston FBI official reaches plea deal on ethics charges

Federal prosecutors are recommending that a former head of the Boston FBI office serve no prison time and pay a $15,000 fine in exchange for pleading guilty to an ethics violation.

Terms of the plea agreement between the government and Kenneth W. Kaiser, 57, of Hopkinton, were disclosed Wednesday in a legal filing in federal court in Boston. He is charged with a misdemeanor offense alleging prohibited contacts with former colleagues within a year of leaving the FBI.

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Kaiser, a 27-year veteran of the bureau, ran the Boston office from 2003 to 2006.

According to prosecutors, he started working for the Beverly-based company LocatePlus, which sells investigative databases, on July 3, 2009, the same day that he retired from the FBI. He was tasked with conducting an internal investigation into wrongdoing by two of LocatePlus’s former executives and was also hired to help the company boost sales.

Starting about two weeks later, court records show, Kaiser began communicating and meeting with FBI agents in Boston and a federal prosecutor, pushing for charges to be filed against the former executives and to have LocatePlus listed as a victim.

Kaiser also allegedly had prohibited contacts with FBI employees to gauge the bureau’s interest in LocatePlus’s products and services.

He was charged earlier this month and is scheduled to plead guilty on Oct. 3.

Prosecutors agreed to recommend a reduction in his offense level, a number that factors into sentencing decisions, based in part on his “prompt acceptance of personal responsibility” in the case, his plea agreement stated.

The agreement was reached between Kaiser and federal prosecutors in Connecticut, who are handling the case to avoid the appearance of a conflict.

Milton J. Valencia of the Globe Staff contributed to this report. Travis Andersen can be reached at travis.andersen@globe.com.
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