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Fog blanketed much of the area Wednesday morning. But pretty soon you’ll need some real blankets. Temperatures will drop later this week, bringing the potential for a dusting of snow, the National Weather Service said.

Temperatures will begin to fall below average overnight Thursday, bringing the “very low probability that we could see a dusting of snow on Friday,” around daybreak, said Stephanie Dunten, a weather service meteorologist. As temperatures begin to rise Friday to the low 40s, the precipitation will turn to rain. Possible showers in the morning will gave way to clear skies later in the day.

Wednesday’s commute was affected by dense fog over most of Central and Eastern Massachusetts.

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“It’s really just dense fog which means visibility is at a quarter-mile. In some places, it’s zero,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Joe Dellicarpini. The weather service issued a dense fog advisory for almost all the Bay State. Originally effective until 11 a.m., the advisory was extended to 4 p.m. along the coast, with forecasters warning visibility could be near zero in some places.

National Weather Service meteorologist Bill Simpson said late Wednesay morning that “the worst is over.” Visibility had improved, Simpson said, and “as far as driving, things are OK.”

Later Wednesday there will be “a very slight chance of maybe a few sprinkles or some light showers,” Dunten said. The morning’s clouds will gradually clear throughout the day, and high temperatures could reach the mid-60s.

Thursday will see increasing clouds throughout the day, with temperatures in the upper 40s. There is a chance of rain after midnight before temperatures drop just low enough for snow.

The weekend will be sunny or partly sunny, but Dunten said the cold temperatures will likely stick around into next week — Saturday and Sunday’s high temperatures will hover in the high 30s or low 40s.

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Pedestrians walked along the shore in South Boston.
Pedestrians walked along the shore in South Boston.David L. Ryan/Globe staff

Kiera Blessing can be reached at kiera.blessing@globe.com.