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List of those indicted in NECC case

To federal prosecutors, the New England Compounding Center operated not as a health care company, but as a "criminal enterprise" where leaders and some top employees knowingly sent poisonous prescriptions to patients solely to generate more cash for the owners.

The 131-count indictment brought against 14 people associated with the company alleges that the owners of NECC and a related company, Medical Sales Management Inc., deliberately misled federal and state regulators, while ignoring health and safety rules.

Below is a list of those indicted and the roles they allegedly played at NECC and MSM.

Barry J. CaddenCadden was president and head pharmacist of NECC, a role in which prosecutors say he oversaw all of the company’s operations. Cadden was also an owner and director, and allegedly trained and instructed sales representatives. He faces multiple charges, including 25 counts of second-degree murder for the deaths of 25 people killed by tainted steroids.

Glenn A. Chin

A licensed pharmacist, Chin had supervisory responsibility for all aspects of drug production between 2010 and 2012 in two clean rooms. Those rooms are supposed to be sterile areas for the production of drugs, but US Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz said conditions at the company were "filthy." Chin allegedly played a key role with Cadden in producing tainted or unsafe drugs. Chin, too, faces multiple charges, including 25 counts of second-degree murder for the deaths of 25 people killed by tainted steroids.

Gregory A. Conigliaro

Conigliaro was an owner and director of NECC who also served as vice president, treasurer, and general manager. He was responsible for regulatory compliance for NECC. He was owner and director of Medical Sales Management. He is accused of jointly helping Cadden to mislead state and federal regulators about NECC's operations, insisting that the company did not qualify as a manufacturer and falsifying prescription records to make it look like a compounding pharmacy.

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Carla R. Conigliaro

The majority shareholder of NECC and a director of the company, Carla R. Conigliaro faces criminal contempt charges for allegedly transferring $33.3 million in assets in 2013 after a bankruptcy judge ordered their assets frozen.

Douglas A. Conigliaro

Conigliaro, who is Carla Conigliaro's husband and Gregory Conigliaro's brother, was an owner and director of Medical Sales Management. He also faces criminal contempt charges for the transfer of the $33.3 million.

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Gene Svirskiy

A licensed pharmacist who worked in Clean Room 1 and was supervising pharmacist in Clean Room 2, Svirskiy is accused, along with Cadden and other NECC employees, of knowingly using expired medicine during the manufacturing process and then falsifying records to hide that fact. He was allegedly also alerted to unsanitary conditions, but failed to act.

Christopher M. Leary

Leary, also a licensed pharmacist, worked in both clean rooms between March 2011 and October 2012. He is accused, along with Cadden, and other NECC employees, of knowingly using expired medicine during the manufacturing process and then falsifying records to hide that fact. He was also allegedly alerted to unsanitary conditions, but failed to act.

Joseph M. Evanosky

A licensed pharmacist, Evanosky worked in Clean Room 1 between April 2011 and October 2012. He is accused, along with Cadden and other NECC employees, of knowingly using expired medicine and falsifying records. Authorities say he also failed to act when told about unsanitary conditions.

Scott M. Connolly

A pharmacy technician, from January 2010 to August 2012, he worked in Clean Room 2 although he had surrendered his state license following a disciplinary action in 2009. With the knowledge of Cadden, Chin, and Svirskiy, the unlicensed Connolly allegedly made cardioplegia drugs for hospitals to use when they stopped a patient's heart during surgery. Connolly used Cadden's login to hide his role in the company, prosecutors say.

Sharon P. Carter

A pharmacy technician and long-time NECC employee, Carter was director of operations for NECC in 2012, overseeing the processing, packaging, and shipping personnel. Carter, along with others, allegedly convinced NECC clients to use fabricated individual prescriptions and to use fake patient names to avoid being regulated as a drugmaker.

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Alla V. Stepanets

A licensed pharmacist, Stepanets worked for NECC between 2008 and 2012 and was assigned to check orders before they were sent from NECC to patients. Stepanets, along with others, allegedly instructed MSM salespeople to tell clients NECC would ship bulk orders of drugs without the names of actual patients.

Robert A. Ronzio

Starting in September 2011, Ronzio was the national sales director for NECC and supervised sales representatives from MSM who were selling NECC-produced drugs. In one e-mail, in which he used all capital letters, Ronzio warned the MSM sales staff to "NEVER PUT ANYTHING IN WRITING" and to never use the word, "BACKFILL,'' the indictment said, because that proved NECC was revising false records when they were given the name of an actual patient.

Kathy S. Chin

A licensed pharmacist, Chin worked for NECC between November 2010 and October 2012. She worked in the packing area, where she was responsible for checking orders before shipment. At least four times in 2011 and 2012, Chin allegedly shipped bulk medicine with fake patient names such as Flash Gordon, Stuart Little, and Tony Tiger.

Michelle L. Thomas

Thomas, also a licensed pharmacist, worked in the NECC packing area from March 2012 until August 2012. In the spring of 2012, Thomas allegedly shipped bulk medicine with fake patient names such as Mary Lamb, Ginger Rogers, Mike Marker, and Carol Sharpie. Along with Stepanets, Thomas also used the names L.L. Bean, Filet O'Fish, and Harry Potter, among other names.

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John R. Ellement can be reached at ellement@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @JREbosglobe.