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Caitlyn Jenner promotes Mass. transgender bill

Reality television star Caitlyn Jenner is appearing in a new social media campaign to support a transgender anti-discrimination bill before the state Legislature.
Danny Moloshok/Reuters
Reality television star Caitlyn Jenner is appearing in a new social media campaign to support a transgender anti-discrimination bill before the state Legislature.

Reality television star Caitlyn Jenner and Boston Bruins center Patrice Bergeron are appearing in a new social media campaign to support a transgender anti-discrimination bill before the state Legislature.

Attorney General Maura Healey started the campaign on Facebook and Twitter with her own video calling on the public to support a bill “against discrimination, against harassment” and to promote it with the hashtag #EveryoneWelcome on social media.

The attorney general then released a video from Jenner, a gold-medal Olympic decathlete and the country’s best known transgender person, saying “no one should be called names or denied service or attacked simply because they are transgender.”

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The legislation would bar discrimination in restaurants, malls and other public accommodations.

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Healey’s office later released videos from Bergeron, soccer player Abby Wambach, and Celtics co-owner Steve Pagliuca, with plans to post more takes from Senator Elizabeth Warren and Harvard University professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

The cast of the Amazon show “Transparent” and Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh will submit videos for the campaign, too, according to the attorney general’s office.

Healey has sunk significant political capital into winning passage of the bill. Senate President Stanley C. Rosenberg and House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo have declared their support, but Governor Charlie Baker has deflected questions about the measure, saying the “devil is always in the details.”

Opponents say they are concerned about the privacy rights of women and girls who might feel uncomfortable sharing a bathroom or locker room with a person born with male anatomy, but identifying as a woman.

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David Scharfenberg can be reached at david.scharfenberg@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @dscharfGlobe