Metro

Teachers Association vows to fight lifting charter ban

Barbara Madeloni was reelected as the Massachusetts Teachers Association’s president.

Dina Rudick/Globe Staff

Barbara Madeloni was reelected as the Massachusetts Teachers Association’s president.

Delegates of the Massachusetts Teachers Association have reelected Barbara Madeloni as the union’s president and approved more than $9 million to fight a ballot initiative that would lift the cap on charter schools, the MTA reported in interviews and on its website.

Madeloni, initially elected president in 2014, received 805 votes Saturday in the three-way contest for president, while vice president Janet Anderson received 479, and former vice president Timothy Sullivan received 291, according to the MTA. Madeloni was elected to another two-year term.

Advertisement

The delegates’ decision to dedicate $9.2 million to the Save Our Public Schools campaign to retain the cap on charter schools, “underscored the association’s commitment to fight a procharter initiative headed for the state ballot this November,” the MTA stated. “The measure could lead to the loss of billions of dollars in public school funding to charters.”

The MTA represents more than 110,000 members across Massachusetts. The union’s 1,647 registered delegates met for two days at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston, according to the MTA.

Get Fast Forward in your inbox:
Forget yesterday's news. Get what you need today in this early-morning email.
Thank you for signing up! Sign up for more newsletters here

Madeloni said Sunday in a phone interview that the money approved for the ballot contest will contribute to building a wide-ranging grass-roots campaign.

“This is going to be the definition of a grass-roots movement,” she said. The union intends to “use our power to reclaim public education from corporate interests.”

Marc Kenen, executive director of the Massachusetts Charter Public School Association, said in response to the MTA meeting: “We regret that the MTA spent its weekend scheming about how to deny high-quality public school options for all children in the Commonwealth.”

Advertisement

A recent Boston Globe poll suggested Massachusetts voters lean toward lifting the cap on the number of charter schools in the state.

Fifty percent of likely voters said they would support a November ballot question to lift the cap. Thirty-three percent were opposed, and 16 percent undecided. The live land-line and cellphone poll of 500 likely voters was conducted May 2-5 and had a margin of error of 4.4 percentage points.

Mark Arsenault can be reached at mark.arsenault@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @BostonGlobeMark.
Loading comments...
Real journalists. Real journalism. Subscribe to The Boston Globe today.
You're reading  1 of 5 free articles.
Get UNLIMITED access for only 99¢ per week Subscribe Now >
You're reading1 of 5 free articles.Keep scrolling to see more articles recomended for you Subscribe now
We hope you've enjoyed your 5 free articles.
Continue reading by subscribing to Globe.com for just 99¢.
 Already a member? Log in Home
Subscriber Log In

We hope you've enjoyed your 5 free articles'

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Already a subscriber?
Your city. Your stories. Your Globe.
Yours FREE for two weeks.
Enjoy free unlimited access to Globe.com for the next two weeks.
Limited time only - No credit card required!
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.
Thanks & Welcome to Globe.com
You now have unlimited access for the next two weeks.
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.