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    The power of will: Chapter 5

    FOR WILL LACEY PROJECT only--- 03/07/2015 RANDOLPH, MA Will Lacey (cq) (left) took a selfie with Dr. Giselle Sholler (cq) during the "Cure Me I'm Irish" fundraiser for BeatNB, held at Lombardo's in Randolph. (Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe)
    Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe
    Will Lacey (left) took a selfie with Dr. Giselle Sholler during the 2015 "Cure Me I'm Irish" fund-raiser for BeatNB, held at Lombardo's in Randolph.
    Dorchester, MA., 03/18/15, Will Lacey takes a break at rehab. When Will Lacey was a baby, he was diagnosed with neuroblastoma. Doctors were never able to get the cancer into remission, and his parents were told to take Will home to Braintree to die. They did not. Instead, they connected with an experimental doctor who has been able to make incredible strides in the fight against neuroblastoma, and much of that is because of a charity Will�s parents started to fund her work. When this process started, Will�s parents joined a support group with the parents of 50 other children with neuroblastoma. Those children are all dead. Will just turned 10, and is itching to get back to his hockey team after a recent health setback (the treatments have not been without complications, including a recent brain bleed). And thanks to the charity and the doctor�s work, there are many other stories just like Will�s. Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff
    Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff
    Will Lacey takes a break during physical therapy in 2015, as he continued his recovery from a brain bleed.
    (BOSTON.COM AND GETTY OUT UNTIL PUBLICATION IN THE BOSTON GLOBE.) Braintree, MA., 05/21/15, Will Lacey and his father Patrick work in the Beat NB offices in advance of a board meeting. When Will Lacey was a baby, he was diagnosed with neuroblastoma. Doctors were never able to get the cancer into remission, and his parents were told to take Will home to Braintree to die. They did not. Instead, they connected with an experimental doctor who has been able to make incredible strides in the fight against neuroblastoma, and much of that is because of a charity Will�s parents started to fund her work. When this process started, Will�s parents joined a support group with the parents of 50 other children with neuroblastoma. Those children are all dead. Will just turned 10, and is itching to get back to his hockey team after a recent health setback (the treatments have not been without complications, including a recent brain bleed). And thanks to the charity and the doctor�s work, there are many other stories just like Will�s. Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe
    Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff
    Will Lacey and his father, Patrick, work in the BeatNB offices in advance of a board meeting in 2015.
    Dorchester, MA., 03/18/15, Will Lacey works at rehab. When Will Lacey was a baby, he was diagnosed with neuroblastoma. Doctors were never able to get the cancer into remission, and his parents were told to take Will home to Braintree to die. They did not. Instead, they connected with an experimental doctor who has been able to make incredible strides in the fight against neuroblastoma, and much of that is because of a charity Will�s parents started to fund her work. When this process started, Will�s parents joined a support group with the parents of 50 other children with neuroblastoma. Those children are all dead. Will just turned 10, and is itching to get back to his hockey team after a recent health setback (the treatments have not been without complications, including a recent brain bleed). And thanks to the charity and the doctor�s work, there are many other stories just like Will�s. Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff
    Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff
    Will Lacey working with a physical therapist.
    06/18/2015 HINGHAM, MA Will Lacey (cq) puts on a helmet before skating at Pilgrim Skating Arena (cq) in Hingham. (Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe)
    Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe
    Will puts on a helmet before skating at Pilgrim Skating Arena in Hingham.
    06/18/2015 HINGHAM, MA L-R Will Lacey (cq), sister Catherine, 6, and his dad Patrick Lacey (cq), skate at Pilgrim Skating Arena (cq) in Hingham. (Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe)
    Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe
    Will Lacey, his sister Catherine, now 7, and his father, Pat, skate at Pilgrim Skating Arena in Hingham.
    FOR LACEY PROJECT ONLY. Braintree, MA., 03/20/15, Will Lacey takes practice shots for hours in his basement, the family's old dryer taking hard shots from the puck. He is recovering from a recent brain bleed and is waiting clearance to play on the ice again with his team. When Will Lacey was a baby, he was diagnosed with neuroblastoma. Doctors were never able to get the cancer into remission, and his parents were told to take Will home to Braintree to die. They did not. Instead, they connected with an experimental doctor who has been able to make incredible strides in the fight against neuroblastoma, and much of that is because of a charity Will�s parents started to fund her work. When this process started, Will�s parents joined a support group with the parents of 50 other children with neuroblastoma. Those children are all dead. Will just turned 10, and is itching to get back to his hockey team after a recent health setback (the treatments have not been without complications, including a recent brain bleed). And thanks to the charity and the doctor�s work, there are many other stories just like Will�s. Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff
    Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff
    Will Lacey spends hours shooting pucks in his basement. An old dryer next to the net is covered with puck marks.
    Braintree, MA., 03/20/15, Will Lacey checks on the well being of a new fish in his bedroom. When Will Lacey was a baby, he was diagnosed with neuroblastoma. Doctors were never able to get the cancer into remission, and his parents were told to take Will home to Braintree to die. They did not. Instead, they connected with an experimental doctor who has been able to make incredible strides in the fight against neuroblastoma, and much of that is because of a charity Will�s parents started to fund her work. When this process started, Will�s parents joined a support group with the parents of 50 other children with neuroblastoma. Those children are all dead. Will just turned 10, and is itching to get back to his hockey team after a recent health setback (the treatments have not been without complications, including a recent brain bleed). And thanks to the charity and the doctor�s work, there are many other stories just like Will�s. Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff
    Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff
    Will checked on the well-being of a new fish in his Braintree bedroom.
    NOT FOR PUBLICATION ON LINE OR GETTY UNTIL PUBLICATION IN THE PRINT EDITON OF THE BOSTON GLOBE. Falmouth, Ma., 08/16/15, Pat Lacey's fundraising at the Falmouth road race. For Billy Baker story on the hunt for the cure for NB. Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff
    Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff
    Pat and Will cheered on the BeatNB charity runners who were participating in the Falmouth Road Race.
    ( CREDIT: Lacey family ) Will turned 12 in August of 2016 --- 8.3.750720981 --
    Lacey family
    Another birthday on Cape Cod, this time with a dozen cupcakes.
    Will, age 12, topping the Christmas tree. November 29, 2016. Photo by Dina Lacey.
    Lacey family
    Will topping the Lacey tree before Christmas this year.