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Fire victims receive crowd-funded aid in less than a week

CAMBRIDGE — The number of people displaced by the 10-alarm fire that ravaged an East Cambridge neighborhood Saturday afternoon now exceeds 125. The Cambridge Fire Department said Monday morning in a Twitter post that the number of buildings damage
CAMBRIDGE — The number of people displaced by the 10-alarm fire that ravaged an East Cambridge neighborhood Saturday afternoon now exceeds 125. The Cambridge Fire Department said Monday morning in a Twitter post that the number of buildings damage

Cambridge officials have given out more than $87,000 in aid so far to people displaced by the 10-alarm blaze last weekend that destroyed or damaged dozens of residential units in the city’s Wellington-Harrington neighborhood.

The office of Mayor E. Denise Simmons said the city has raised more than $500,000 in assistance for those forced from their homes in the fast-moving blaze Saturday. The Mayor’s Fire Relief Fund has begun to distribute the money in the form of checks and gift cards.

“The people who have lost everything in this fire have also gained something — the sense that thousands of their neighbors and fellow residents are standing with them, rooting for them, and rallying to their side,” the mayor said in a statement. “As mayor of this city, I could not be prouder of our community response.”

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Officials said this week that fire or heat damaged 75 apartments and condo units in 18 residential buildings. A total of 122 people from 57 families were displaced, according to figures released Tuesday.

Investigators said the blaze is believed to be accidental. The Cambridge Fire Department and the state fire marshal’s office are conducting a cause and origin investigation and will eventually come out with a report.

City Manager Louis DePasquale encouraged people who were affected to visit the city’s recovery center on the second floor of City Hall. The center will be open for the rest of the week, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The American Red Cross has been in contact with people from 70 of the 75 damaged units.

Officials also asked any property owner who can offer permanent housing to residents to call 617-349-4321. For more ways to help the victims, click here.


Andy Rosen can be reached at andrew.rosen@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter at @andyrosen.