Metro

Read the texts at the center of the Massachusetts teen suicide case

The trial for Michelle Carter, a young woman accused of persuading a friend to kill himself, is scheduled to begin Tuesday in Bristol County Juvenile Court.

Carter, a Plainville resident who is charged with involuntary manslaughter, has opted for a bench trial in the death of Conrad Roy III, 18, of Mattapoisett.

Roy died in July 2014 from carbon monoxide poisoning after he connected a generator to a truck’s exhaust system.

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Roy and Carter, who was 17 at the time, interacted via text message leading up to the event. The pair also spoke by phone for 47 minutes while he sat in the truck, and she allegedly told him to “get back in” the vehicle when he expressed doubts about taking his own life.

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Carter’s attorney previously told the Globe that Carter’s text messages are protected by the First Amendment and that, under state law, it is not a crime to encourage another person to commit suicide.

As opening statements in the trial are scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. Tuesday, here’s a look back at the texts at the center of the case, which were previously disclosed by prosecutors in court documents.

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Here are some of the exchanges between the two that have been disclosed by prosecutors in court documents.

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In the first, Carter, who was 17 at the time, encourages Roy to take his own life, saying his family will understand and accept it and will eventually “get over it and move on.”

Carter

Everyone will be sad for a while but they will get over it and move on. They won't be in depression. I won't let that happen. They know how sad you are, and they know that you are doing this to be happy and I think they will understand and accept it. They will always carry you in their hearts.

Roy

Aww. Thank you, Michelle.

At times, Carter expresses frustration at Roy’s wavering, chastising him for not killing himself when he said he would.

Carter

Well...I guess [that I am frustrated], just because you always say you are gonna do it but you don't, but last night I know you really wanted to do it and I'm not mad. Well, I mean kind of, I guess, just because you always say you're gonna do it...but you don't but last night I knew you really wanted to and I'm not mad.

The two teenagers discuss the best way for Roy to die. At one point, Carter questions Roy about his decision to use a portable generator to emit carbon monoxide into his truck.

Carter

I know. Do they still give off a lot of it though. Did they fix it after that article called them out?

Roy

It emits more than cars.

Carter

Are you positive?

Roy

December 2013, pretty recent.

Carter

You could take that in your truck and take some Benadryls just in case.

Roy

Yeah, I'm gonna fall asleep and peacefully die.

Carter

Yeah, that's the best way.

On the day of his suicide, Roy and Carter exchange a flurry of text messages, starting with a message from Carter at 4:19 a.m. Roy expresses hesitation about killing himself, but Carter continues to pressure him, saying, “It’s time to do it today.”

Roy

Like, why am I so hesitant lately. Like two weeks ago I was willing to try everything and now I'm worse, really bad, and I'm LOL not following through. It's eating me inside.

Carter

You're hesitant because you keeping over thinking it and keep pushing it off. You just need to do it, Conrad. The more you push it off, the more it will eat at you. You're ready and prepared. All you have to do is turn the generator on and you will be free and happy. No more pushing it off. No more waiting.

Roy

You're right.

Carter

If you want it as bad as you say you do it's time to do it today.

Roy then goes for a walk, according to the text message conversation, but he remains concerned about his family. Carter assures him she will take care of them.

Roy

I don't know. I'm freaking out again. I'm over thinking.

Carter

I thought you wanted to do this. This time is right and you're ready. You just need to do it.

Carter

You can't keep living this way. You just need to do it like you did the last time and not think about it and just do it, babe. You can't keep doing this every day.

Roy

I do want to but I'm freaking for my family I guess. I don't know.

Carter

Conrad, I told you I'll take care of them. Everyone will take care of them to make sure they won't be alone and people will help them get through it. We talked about this and they will be okay and accept it. People who commit suicide don't think this much. They just could do it.

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Roy goes to the beach and takes his sisters to get ice cream. He promises Carter he will “do it” when he returns.

Here are their final text messages. The last one was sent at 6:25 p.m.

Carter

You just have to do it like you said. Are you gonna do it now?

Roy

I still haven't left yet, ha ha.

Carter

Why?

Roy

Leaving now.

Carter

Okay. You can do this.

Roy

Okay. I'm almost there.

At about the same time, Roy left his mother’s house and drove to the Fairhaven K-Mart parking lot, prosecutors said in the court documents.

At 6:28 p.m., he called Carter and talked to her for 43 minutes. At 7:12 p.m., he called her again. Their phones were connected for 47 minutes, prosecutors said.

He was found dead in his truck the next day.

John R. Ellement, Jan Ransom, and Catherine Cloutier contributed to this report.