Metro

This day in history

Today is Thursday, July 13, the 194th day of 2017. There are 171 days left in the year.

Birthdays: Game show announcer Johnny Gilbert is 93. Actor Patrick Stewart is 77. Actor Harrison Ford is 75. The Byrds singer-guitarist Roger McGuinn is 75. Comedian Cheech Marin is 71. Actress Didi Conn is 66. Twisted Sister musician Mark ‘‘The Animal’’ Mendoza is 61. Director Cameron Crowe is 60. Actor Ken Jeong is 48. Soul singer Leon Bridges is 28.

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In 1787, the Congress of the Confederation adopted the Northwest Ordinance, which established a government in the Northwest Territory, an area corresponding to the eastern half of the present-day Midwest.

In 1863, deadly rioting against the Civil War military draft erupted in New York City. (The insurrection was put down three days later.)

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In 1939, Frank Sinatra made his first commercial recording, ‘‘From the Bottom of My Heart’’ and ‘‘Melancholy Mood,’’ with Harry James and his Orchestra.

In 1960, John F. Kennedy won the Democratic presidential nomination on the first ballot at his party’s convention in Los Angeles.

In 1977, a blackout hit New York City in the mid-evening as lightning strikes on electrical equipment caused power to fail; widespread looting broke out. (The electricity was restored about 25 hours later.)

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In 1978, Lee Iacocca was fired as president of Ford Motor Co. by chairman Henry Ford II.

In 1985, ‘‘Live Aid,’’ an international rock concert in London, Philadelphia, Moscow, and Sydney, took place to raise money for starving people in Africa.

In 2013, a jury in Sanford, Fla., acquitted neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman of all charges in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager; news of the verdict prompted Alicia Garza, an African-American activist in Oakland, California, to declare on Facebook that ‘‘black lives matter,’’ a phrase that gave rise to the Black Lives Matter movement.

In 2007, former media mogul Conrad Black was convicted in Chicago of swindling the Hollinger International newspaper empire out of millions of dollars. (Black was sentenced to 6½ years in federal prison but had his sentence reduced to three years; he was freed in May 2012.)

Last year, with emotions running raw, President Obama met privately at the White House with elected officials, law enforcement leaders and members of the Black Lives Matter movement with the goal of getting them to work together to curb violence and build trust.

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