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The other Lizzie Borden house is on the market

Lizzie Bowen's home in Maplecroft.
Herald News
Lizzie Bowen's home in Maplecroft.

For sale: The Fall River home where an accused, but never convicted, murderer lived out her days.

The house is where Lizzie Borden settled after she was acquitted of killing her father and stepmother with an ax, The Herald News reports. It is located a few miles from the family house where the two were slain in August 1892, murders seized upon by national media coverage because of their gruesome nature.

The home for sale features 14 rooms, including eight bedrooms, and comes with all the furnishings. The asking price: The asking price: $849,900.

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Kristee Bates of Texas, a fan of unsolved murder mysteries, purchased the French Street home for $500,000 in 2014. She then renovated the property with period details. It still has the original parquet floors.

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Bates had sought to convert the three-story Queen Anne Victorian for multiple uses, including a bed and breakfast, museum, and events center. But the plans fell through.

Over the years, the home has become a popular tourist stop, thanks to the enduring interest in Borden.

Lizzie and her sister Emma would inherit a significant portion of their father’s estate. He had a net worth of around $10 million in today’s money. The sisters purchased the grand residence in 1894, after Lizzie had been cleared of the murders and spent months in the New Bedford jail. They christened it Maplecroft and hired a full staff, including a housekeeper, live-in maids, and a coachman.

Even though she had been acquitted, Lizzie was shunned by Fall River society.

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Just five years after the murder, Lizzie was briefly in the headlines again, when she was accused of — but not tried for — shoplifting in Providence.

The sisters shared the house until Emma abruptly moved away in 1905, leaving her sister to reside alone for the remainder of her life. Lizzie died of pneumonia in 1927.

Fascination about the murders continues to this day. No one else was ever charged.

The family home where the killings occurred, on Second Street, is now the Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast Museum. The Lizzie and Emma Suite for two goes for $247 per night. In addition to bunking down in the historic (though creepy) abode, guests can book a private 20-minute spiritual reading with the inn’s own house psychic.

Roy Greene can be reached at roy.greene@globe.com.