Metro

Woman who lived in Brookline home with sister’s corpse wants property demolished

The home on Clinton Road where two elderly sisters lived.
Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff
The home on Clinton Road where two elderly sisters lived.

The woman who apparently lived for a year with her sister’s corpse inside their Brookline home wants permission from the town to tear down their 97-year-old house that is assessed at $1.3 million even though a neighbor said it is overrun by animals and is uninhabitable.

Using the name Lynda Wheaton, the surviving sister has applied for a permit to demolish 122 Clinton Road, and the request will be heard by the town’s Preservation Commission at its next meeting, set for Nov. 20, according to the agenda posted on its website.

The body of her younger sister, whose legal name was Sheryl Waldman but who called herself Hope Wheaton, was found lying underneath a kitchen table by a relative late last year, and authorities have not brought any criminal charges against Lynda Wheaton.

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The medical examiner’s office this summer concluded after an autopsy that the cause and manner of death was “undetermined.”

After the discovery of the woman’s body, town officials moved to condemn the building and required Lynda Wheaton to move out of the home. The Globe chronicled the lives of the sisters earlier this year, and when reached at a Boston-area hotel, Lynda (Wheaton) Waldman said she was “not a lunatic” but declined to discuss the situation further.

Brookline Demolition Application
A bedroom inside the home.

Neighbor Pete Allen said Thursday the town has notified him as an abutter about the demolition request, which he will not oppose.

“It’s in pretty bad shape,’’ he said in a telephone interview Thursday from his home adjacent to 122 Clinton. “I see animals coming into the eaves of the house.”

Allen said at least three people have contacted him and his mother — even though they have no legal connection to the home — asking to be alerted if the property goes on sale.

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John R. Ellement can be reached at ellement@globe.com.