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Newton man jailed for forgery faces more legal trouble

Prosecutors allege that David Scher, after his release from jail earlier this year, lied about his credentials and claimed “to be employed as ‘in-house patent counsel’ for an Abington business,” the statement said.
Prosecutors allege that David Scher, after his release from jail earlier this year, lied about his credentials and claimed “to be employed as ‘in-house patent counsel’ for an Abington business,” the statement said.(Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff/File 2016)

A Newton man once honored as a rising young realtor before serving jail time for forgery of a verdict slip is once again in trouble with the law.

David Scher, 35, was charged Tuesday with falsely claiming to hold a law degree and taken into custody for violating parole, Suffolk District Attorney Daniel F. Conley’s office said in a statement.

Prosecutors allege that Scher, after his release from jail earlier this year, lied about his credentials and claimed “to be employed as ‘in-house patent counsel’ for an Abington business,” the statement said.

The allegations are the latest chapter in a bizarre tale of subterfuge involving Scher, whom the magazine of the National Association of Realtors previously named one of the top 30 realtors under age 30.

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At Scher’s arraignment in Boston Municipal Court, the judge did not impose monetary bail, but ordered Scher to remain in custody for violating his parole on his conviction in April for “offenses related to forgery of a verdict slip,” in 2014, prosecutors said in a press release.

Prior to his forgery conviction, Scher, had been no stranger to the court system, filing lawsuits against parties including the cities of Boston and Newton, the people who rented his condo, and his own parents, who called him a “hyena” and a “sleaze ball” in e-mails.

In one 2012 case, Scher sued the trustee owners of a West Roxbury home after his attempt to buy the house fell through. The trustee, an 85-year-old man with failing vision, said in an affidavit that Scher and the trustee’s nephew had misled him into signing a purchase and sale agreement, telling him it was for $300,000 when in fact it was for $130,000.

Eventually, the suit was settled with an agreement that the house would be put on the market and Scher would get $36,000 of the proceeds.

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Scher wasn’t so lucky in April, when a judge sentenced him to serve a year in jail for a forgery conviction, stemming from his brazen doctoring in 2014 of a verdict slip that jurors filled out when they found him guilty of stealing a laptop from Suffolk University Law School, where Scher was a student.

Rather than accept the jury’s finding, Scher walked into the clerk’s office and pulled the public case file, altering the verdict slip so that it showed a verdict of not guilty.

He also submitted the phony slip to the state Board of Registration of Real Estate Brokers and Salespersons, which was holding administrative proceedings to revoke his broker’s license, prosecutors have said.


Nestor Ramos of the Globe staff and Correspondent Jake Johnson contributed to this report. Travis Andersen can be reached at tandersen@globe.com.