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Yes, that’s Representative Capuano wearing an Eagles helmet to work

A photo tweeted by a New York Times reporter showed Representative Michael E. Capuano of Massachusetts wearing an Eagles helmet during a meeting of the House Committee on Financial Services on Tuesday.
Alan Rappeport
A photo tweeted by a New York Times reporter showed Representative Michael E. Capuano of Massachusetts wearing an Eagles helmet during a meeting of the House Committee on Financial Services on Tuesday.

Representative Michael E. Capuano made a hard-headed bet before the New England Patriots fell to the Philadelphia Eagles in the Super Bowl on Sunday, leaning heavily on the idea that his team would come out on top.

Unfortunately, he was wrong. And this week, he lived up to his word.

During a meeting of the House Committee on Financial Services in the Rayburn House Office Building on Tuesday, the congressman, who represents parts of Boston, Cambridge, and other nearby areas, was spotted wearing an Eagles football helmet snugly on his head.

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One reporter noticed the odd sight, quickly taking a photo and uploading it to Twitter.

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Alison Mills, Capuano’s communications director, confirmed that it was indeed Capuano hiding behind the face plate of the green-and-silver helmet. She said in an e-mail that the elected official lost a bet that he made prior to the big game with Robert Brady, who represents Pennsylvania’s First Congressional District, which includes parts of Philadelphia.

The helmet was given to Capuano by Brady to fulfill the risky gamble. Capuano wrote about losing to Brady and the Eagles on Facebook Tuesday morning, in a good-natured status update. “When you lose a bet you have to pay up,” he said. “Congrats to the Eagles.’’

The idea to wear a helmet on Capitol Hill may have been an instance of revenge for Brady, who comically shares a last name with New England’s beloved quarterback.

In 2005, when the Patriots routed the Eagles at Super Bowl XXXIX, Brady — the congressman — had to don a New England helmet after losing a bet with then-Representative Marty Meehan.

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Capuano is early on living up to his wager. Others — businesses, organizations, and politicians — still have to follow through on their own bets.

Below is a list of some of the bets that were placed:

 This likely isn’t music to his ears: Boston Symphony Orchestra music director Andris Nelsons has to, at some point, wear an Eagles jersey during a rehearsal.

 Governor Charlie Baker will need to pack up some of the state’s “finest local offerings” — New England clam chowder; Craisins from Ocean Spray; Apple Cider Donuts from Smolak Farms; apple pie, chicken pot pie, and Maple Syrup from Hollis Hills Farms; and other goods — to Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf.

 The Museum of Fine Arts has to give up its painting of “Mercy Otis Warren” for a visit to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, a difficult hand-off after what the museum assumed would be “an unlikely Eagles victory.”

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 The animal kingdom is probably in an uproar over the upset, too. Zoo New England partnered with both the Roger Williams Park Zoo, in Providence, and the Beardsley Zoo in Bridgeport, Conn., and agreed that if the Patriots lost they would all have workers clean an animal cage at each of the zoos while wearing Eagles gear. Further, Zoo New England made an agreement with the Philadelphia Zoo to name its next goat — Tom Brady’s nickname is the GOAT, for Greatest of All Time — after Eagles quarterback Nick Foles, in the event of a loss.

Steve Annear can be reached at steve.annear@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @steveannear.