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    Lawyers for mystery Powerball winner will claim windfall, announce donation

    The mystery woman who won a $560 million Powerball jackpot in New Hampshire in January announced that her trust will donate a combined $250,000 to Girls Inc. of New Hampshire and three chapters of End 68 Hours of Hunger.
    Dina Rudick/Globe Staff/file
    The mystery woman who won a $560 million Powerball jackpot in New Hampshire in January announced that her trust will donate a combined $250,000 to Girls Inc. of New Hampshire and three chapters of End 68 Hours of Hunger.

    She’s not giving up her name if she prevails in court, but she is giving away some cash.

    Lawyers for the mystery woman who won a $560 million Powerball jackpot in New Hampshire in January officially claimed her windfall Wednesday and announced that her trust will donate a combined $250,000 to Girls Inc. of New Hampshire and three chapters of End 68 Hours of Hunger.

    Attorneys for the woman, dubbed Jane Doe in court filings, and officials from the state Lottery Commission announced the contributions during a press conference in Concord, where Doe’s legal team accepted the prize on behalf of their client’s trust.

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    The trust is called the Good Karma Family 2018 Nominee Trust.

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    The bigger prize for media outlets remains the woman’s name, but she’s suing the state for the right to remain anonymous.

    According to her civil complaint, Doe won the jackpot in early January and signed the back of her ticket before realizing a trust could have signed the ticket and accepted the money on her behalf, keeping her name private.

    She wants a judge to order her name withheld from public records requests or let her replace her name on the ticket with a trust that she’s since created.

    State officials say altering the ticket will make it invalid.

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    In court filings last month, the lottery commission gave the green light to paying out the prize to Doe’s trust while the issue of whether her name will be released remains pending.

    Doe has a crack legal team pressing her case in court. She’s represented by Shaheen & Gordon, a firm cofounded by William Shaheen, former US attorney for New Hampshire and the husband of Senator Jeanne Shaheen.

    “On behalf of the Good Karma Family 2018 Nominee Trust, we are pleased to accept this Powerball prize,” William Shaheen said Wednesday in a statement released by lottery officials. “We recognize the tremendous interest this prize has generated but hope you appreciate our client’s desire to maintain a sense of normalcy by keeping her name confidential. What little I can say, is that she and her family have had a longstanding commitment to their community and are thrilled to be able to enhance their impact through targeted philanthropy for generations to come.”

    In the statement, the lottery said Doe opted for a one-time cash payout of her winnings, which netted her $264 million after taxes.

    “The New Hampshire Lottery is excited to award yet another Powerball jackpot to some very fortunate Granite State residents,” lottery executive director Charlie McIntyre said in the release. “While we don’t know the winner’s identity, we do know that her heart is in the right place. These substantial donations are an indication of her generosity and they will make a significant difference in the lives of many throughout our community.”

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    Girls Inc., a Manchester-based group that offers enrichment programs and other services to girls, will get $150,000 from Doe, officials said.

    The Nashua, Dover, and Derry offices of the nonprofit End 68 Hours of Hunger will get $33,000 each.

    “Today’s announcement from our lucky winner marks a historic moment for the New Hampshire Lottery, as we award our largest prize in our 54-year history,” lottery commission chairwoman Debra Douglas said in the release. “As the first lottery in the country, that is certainly saying something. This is truly a life-altering prize and it is incredibly gratifying to learn of the winner’s plans to make such an amazing impact on our nonprofit community here in New Hampshire. We are tremendously happy for our winner and we wish her and her family all the best.”

    Danny McDonald of the Globe staff contributed to this report. Travis Andersen can be reached at travis.andersen@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @TAGlobe.