Metro

Take a look at the financial perks State Police troopers enjoy

The Massachusetts State Police has faced widespread scrutiny following a series of revelations of hefty payouts, hidden payroll, and generous perks for troopers.
David L Ryan/Globe Staff
The Massachusetts State Police has faced widespread scrutiny following a series of revelations of hefty payouts, hidden payroll, and generous perks for troopers.

The Massachusetts State Police has faced widespread scrutiny following a series of revelations of hefty payouts, hidden payroll, and generous perks for troopers.

On Thursday, the Globe revealed the state has failed to pay taxes on tens of millions of dollars doled out to troopers as part of a daily $40 perk for driving their own car to work.

The commuting per diem is just one of many benefits included in the union contract covering most of the members of the state’s largest law enforcement agency.

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Other perks include:

 Long-distance commuters: employees who commute 75 or more miles one-way get $75 each week

 Clothing: employees who work in “civilian clothing” 10 days or more each month get a stipend of $62.50 per month

 Days off: employees who work a five-day workweek get an extra 17 days off per year, in order to be fair with those who work four days on duty, then get two days off.

 Hazard bonus pay: staffers get an annual $700 “hazardous duty bonus.” The bonus doubled last year.

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 Sick time: upon retirement, staffers can cash in 20 percent of all sick time unused and accrued since they started

 Nights: those who work evening or night shifts earn an extra $1 per hour

 On call: those in the investigative division, and anyone else tapped by the colonel, get an extra $40 each week for being on call

 College courses: Employees get tuition reimbursement at state colleges and universities, a benefit that extends to their spouses.

Officials from the troopers’ union, the State Police Association of Massachusetts, did not respond to requests for comment about perks outlined in the collective bargaining agreement, which is currently up for renegotiation. State Police spokesman David Procopio said department officials “expect negotiations on a new contact will commence in the near future.”

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News of generous State Police compensation has come as other money-related scandals raise questions about the agency’s oversight of taxpayer dollars, including allegations that 30 troopers put in for hours they never worked and that the agency’s head of payroll stole department funds.

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Matt Rocheleau can be reached at matthew.rocheleau@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @mrochele