Metro

State’s top information technology official, Mark Nunnelly, is stepping down

Mark E. Nunnelly, secretary of the Executive Office of Technology Services and Security, will depart effective June 18, to spend more time with his family, officials said.
Mark E. Nunnelly, secretary of the Executive Office of Technology Services and Security, will depart effective June 18, to spend more time with his family, officials said.

Massachusetts’ top information technology and cybersecurity official, who pivoted from a career at Bain Capital buying companies like Dunkin’ Donuts to the plodding work of state government, is leaving next month, the administration of Governor Charlie Baker announced on Friday.

Mark E. Nunnelly, secretary of the Executive Office of Technology Services and Security, will depart effective June 18, to spend more time with his family, officials said. Curt Wood, a top state public safety official, will succeed him.

“People across the Commonwealth interact with state government online more and more each day, and Secretary Nunnelly’s leadership has been instrumental in ensuring our digital presence is secure and responsive to the needs of our constituents,” Baker said in a statement. “We are grateful for Mark’s service to the Commonwealth in a variety of roles, and for his willingness to take on challenges that affect every corner of state government.”

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In 2015, Baker appointed Nunnelly, 59, as Revenue Department commissioner and a special adviser for technology.

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A year later, Nunnelly transitioned to a top tech role and oversaw the gradual creation of a new Cabinet-level secretariat focused on technology. The formation of the Executive Office of Technology Services and Security, in 2017, was an effort to consolidate, streamline, and secure the state’s far-flung technology services.

In a news release, the administration heralded several efforts that Nunnelly — who has not taken a government salary — helped lead. They include launching the new Mass.gov website, consolidating telecom and hardware purchases to save the state $20 million, ramping up cybersecurity efforts, and updating the unemployment insurance portal.

But there have also been technology snafus during his tenure at IT chief.

At the Massachusetts Department of Revenue, a data breach made private information from about 39,000 business taxpayers visible to other companies, potentially competitors, and lasted from August through Jan. 23, the agency has said.

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The department acknowledged in March that it had failed to deliver timely child support payments to about 1,500 parents since the beginning of the year.

And in April, the tax-collecting agency said the personal information of thousands who pay child support was inadvertently sent to companies that do not employ them.

It is not clear how involved Nunnelly was with those technology troubles or the efforts to fix them.

There was also controversy during Nunnelly’s time leading the revenue department as he remained on high-paying corporate boards. State law prohibits a tax commissioner from engaging in outside business activities for profit.

A Harvard Business School graduate, Nunnelly was one of Mitt Romney’s early recruits at Bain Capital, in 1989, and he worked his way to the highest levels of the private equity firm before retiring in 2014.

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Wood, his successor in the IT post, has served since 2011 as undersecretary for forensic science and technology and the chief information officer within the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and Security.

Frank Phillips contributed to this report. Joshua Miller can be reached at joshua.miller@globe.com.