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    Everything you need to know for the 2018 Boston Pride Parade

    The 2017 Pride Parade made its way through Boston.
    John Tlumacki/Globe Staff/File 2017
    The 2017 Pride Parade made its way through Boston.

    Heading to the Boston Pride Parade this Saturday? Here’s everything you need to know about the route, how to get there, and more.

    When and where

    The parade

    The 48th annual Pride Parade kicks off Saturday at noon in Copley Square and runs through the South End before arriving at a festival on City Hall Plaza. The parade will run through the following streets, according to organizers:

     Begin at Boylston and Clarendon streets

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     Turn right onto Clarendon Street

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     Left onto Tremont Street

     Left onto Berkeley Street

     Left onto Boylston Street

     Left onto Charles Street

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     Right onto Beacon Street

     Left onto Tremont Street

     Ending at City Hall Plaza on Cambridge Street

    The festival

    The Pride festival will be held rain or shine on City Hall Plaza from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. and includes a number of performances, exhibits, and food options. The festival will also include a beer garden for attendees over 21. Following the festival, the Boston Pride Youth Dance event will take place on City Hall Plaza for those under 21 and will feature a dance party and drag performances. Tickets to the dance are $10 at the door.

    How to get there

    Both the city of Boston and Pride Parade organizers are urging attendees to use the MBTA to get to the parade. Copley Square Station on the Green Line is the closest stop, but for those taking the Orange Line or certain commuter rail lines, Back Bay Station is a short walk away. A number of bus lines also serve Copley Square. Check the MBTA website for schedules and routes.

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    If you insist on driving (but really, take public transportation), organizers say that reduced parking rates are available through Spot Hero at spothero.com/boston/gay-pride-parade-parking.

    Weather forecast

    The weather looks pretty good for the parade Saturday. According to the National Weather Service, Saturday promises to be mostly sunny, with a high of around 80 degrees, so slather on that sunscreen and drink plenty of water. A light northwest breeze Saturday afternoon will make things even more pleasant. Saturday night cools to a low of about 58 degrees. And Sunday will be sunny, with a high of 74 degrees, according to NWS.

    Road closures and parking restrictions

    All streets along the parade route will be closed to traffic until about 4 p.m., according to the City of Boston website. Parking restrictions will be in effect on a variety of streets in and around the route:

     Boylston Street, both sides, Massachusetts Avenue to Tremont Street

     Exeter Street, both sides, Newbury Street to St. James Avenue

     Dartmouth Street, both sides, Newbury Street to St. James Avenue

     Gloucester Street, both sides, Newbury Street to Boylston Street

     Fairfield Street, both sides, Boylston Street to Newbury Street

     Clarendon Street, both sides, Newbury Street to Tremont Street

     Tremont Street, both sides, Union Park Street to East Berkeley Street

     Berkeley Street, both sides, Tremont Street to Newbury Street

     Charles Street South, both sides, Park Plaza to Boylston Street

     Charles Street, both sides, Boylston Street to Beacon Street

     Beacon Street, both sides, Charles Street to Tremont Street

     Tremont Street, both sides, Cambridge Street to Beacon Street

     Court Street, both sides, Washington Street to Cambridge Street

     Cambridge Street, Center Plaza side, Bowdoin Street to Court Street, east side, Sudbury Street to New Chardon Street

     New Chardon Street, Cambridge Street to Congress Street

    Globe correspondents Sophie Cannon and Laney Ruckstuhl contributed.