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You can buy John Proctor’s home

The former home of John Proctor is for sale.
The former home of John Proctor is for sale.(Paul Aquipel/J Barrett & Company)

As hoards of tourists flock to Salem for Halloween festivities and to engage with the history of the Salem witch trials, there’s a unique way this year for you to honor the life of John Proctor, convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692: Buy his former house.

Proctor‘s house — located in modern-day Peabody — is up for sale for $600,000.

With six bedrooms, two full bathrooms, and nearly 4,000 square feet, you’ll have ample space to enjoy the history and architecture of the 17th-century home.

The structure was partially built in 1638, and realtor John Cipoletta said there are variety of things within the home that have maintained its authentic look, like the deep, rich tones throughout and the woodwork.

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The home has wood beams, and each room has a fireplace, because fire was the main source of heat in the 1600s.

(Paul Aquipel/J Barrett & Company)
(Paul Aquipel/J Barrett & Company)

The house also has walls that open up to show the original structure and fireplace bricks.

(Paul Aquipel/J Barrett & Company)

The Raponi family, who are selling the home, have owned it since 1968 and have “managed to keep the house to its true form,” Cipoletta said.

(Paul Aquipel/J Barrett & Company)
(Paul Aquipel/J Barrett & Company)

Though many of the features have been maintained, there’s still a bit of uncertainty as to whether Proctor lived in that exact structure, or whether it was mostly rebuilt since his time there, curator Kelly Daniell of the Peabody Historical Society told Boston.com.

Daniell told Boston.com that there has been some testing done on the house that indicates its structure was built after the year Proctor died.

But she said that in-depth testing hasn’t been done to confirm one way or another.

The listing has been up since Oct. 1, and Cipoletta says the interest has already “gone through the roof,” particularly from people in the Wiccan community or people who are interested in purchasing antique homes.

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Cipoletta said he even has interest from a potential buyer in London, who requested a video tour of the home.

“This home truly will be a commitment, unlike buying a [different] home,” Cipoletta said. “. . . This home requires extra love.”

(Paul Aquipel/J Barrett & Company)
(Paul Aquipel/J Barrett & Company)
(Paul Aquipel/J Barrett & Company)
(Paul Aquipel/J Barrett & Company)

Felicia Gans can be reached at felicia.gans@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @FeliciaGans.