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As we close out the month of November, it’s worth talking about just how lousy the weather has been over the past several months, and by some measures, all of 2018.

The reality is many of us complain about the weather at some point over the course of a year. In winter we talk about how it’s too cold and, during the summer, we talk about how it’s too hot and too humid.

When it rains, we lament it’s raining. When it doesn’t rain for days in a row, some of us, including yours truly, complain about the lack of rain.

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While the weather in New England is certainly variable, I think everybody can agree it’s been particularly awful this year.

You may remember that we ended 2017 and began 2018 on the coldest note in a century. There were 6 days in a row under 20 degrees and the high to start the New Year was only 13.

Highs temperatures for the final days of 2017 and early 2018 were the coldest in 100 years.
Highs temperatures for the final days of 2017 and early 2018 were the coldest in 100 years.NOAA Data

The early cold was actually followed by relatively typical temperatures during the rest of that January. But then we had a ridiculously warm February -- I was able to do some gardening and some people went to the beach. Temperature readings reached the 70s for two days in a row in the middle of the month. I made the mistake of cutting back my roses, which would eventually get hammered by the cold and snow that came during the following March and April.

April 2018 was cold and damp with temperatures well below average.
April 2018 was cold and damp with temperatures well below average.NOAA Data

Back then, it seemed like spring would never come. And when it did it, was so brief because of heat and humidity that came with the warmer months. While you may enjoy the warmth of the summer, there were so many days where humidity made it almost intolerable to be outside. Dew points had never been so high for so long, which kept the nights exceedingly warm.

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It remained humid through most of September, and temperatures felt more like they do in August. And when cooler temperatures finally arrived, there was also lots of rain. And when it wasn’t raining, the sun didn’t shine very much either.

All That Rain

Meteorological fall, which runs from Sept. 1 through Nov. 30, will end up being the wettest ever recorded at Blue Hill Observatory. It will also be the second-wettest fall recorded in Worcester and Providence. In Boston, it will be the fourth-wettest fall.

There is no shortage of charts to show just how much rain has fallen, but this first one gives you and idea of how the rain has accumulated since September.

The blue line is the cumulative rainfall that has fallen since September. Notice we are close the wettest ever.
The blue line is the cumulative rainfall that has fallen since September. Notice we are close the wettest ever. NOAA Data
Rainfall has been nearly double average in some spots across the northeast this fall.
Rainfall has been nearly double average in some spots across the northeast this fall.NOAA Data

November has not only been wet, it has been chilly. It’s also been cold enough that in northern New England, snowfall has been plentiful, particularly in places like Kingfield, Maine.

Some ski areas report good conditions, and there are mountains open now which typically don’t offer skiing until December, January, or even later in the winter.

More Coming

The weather pattern will continue to be active with another storm arriving later this weekend. This will feature more rain. I do think there’s a slowdown in the frequency of storminess next week, but it’s going to be quite chilly.

If you want to get your driveway markers into the ground, I suggest you do it this weekend before the ground freezes up next week.

The next few days will be an opportunity to work outside before the rain this weekend and the cold coming next week. There are indications of some mild weather in the middle or later part of December, but it’s questionable whether it would last more than a few days.

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A new storm with rain arrives late Saturday. (Tropical Tidbits)