fb-pixel

With Tom Brady growing older and the temperature reaching a balmy 65 degrees, one of the biggest crowds ever flocked to Boston on Tuesday to celebrate the New England Patriots winning Super Bowl 53.

Several high schools reported higher-than-normal absences as students played hooky to see their team roll by on duck boats, and the MBTA’s commuter rail couldn’t handle the amount of people trying to get into the city. In fact, the commuter rail system saw its highest ridership ever Tuesday morning, Keolis officials said.

“We are seeing extraordinary ridership levels across the entire network, notably higher than seen for previous parades and almost certainly the highest ridership ever seen on the network,” officials said.

Advertisement



Boston Police Commissioner William Gross said Monday that he expected more than 1 million people to watch the parade. Officials declined to provide exact crowd numbers once the event was over — there were hundreds of thousands of people, at the very least — but they did say it was probably one of the biggest ever.

(UPDATE: As of Monday night, Boston police estimated that 1.5 million fans came out to watch the parade.)

Here are photos that show just how many people lined the streets of Boston on Tuesday.

The Boston Public Library in Copley Square was swamped with Patriots fans at the parade on Tuesday.
The Boston Public Library in Copley Square was swamped with Patriots fans at the parade on Tuesday. David L. Ryan/Globe Staff
The crowd in Copley Square.
The crowd in Copley Square.Steven Senne/Associated Press
Thousands of fans lined Boylston Street.
Thousands of fans lined Boylston Street.John Tlumacki/Globe Staff
The crowd on Tremont Street as the parade went by Boston Common.
The crowd on Tremont Street as the parade went by Boston Common.Stan Grossfeld/Globe Staff
Fans filled the large sidewalk from Boylston Street all the way back to the Prudential Center in the Back Bay.
Fans filled the large sidewalk from Boylston Street all the way back to the Prudential Center in the Back Bay.Billie Weiss/Getty Images
Some fans in Back Bay climbed a bus shelter to get a better view.
Some fans in Back Bay climbed a bus shelter to get a better view. Jim Davis/Globe Staff
Thousands of fans lined Boylston Street.
Thousands of fans lined Boylston Street.John Tlumacki/Globe Staff
The view from Copley Square.
The view from Copley Square.David L. Ryan/Globe Staff
Confetti was deployed at Copley Square.
Confetti was deployed at Copley Square.David L. Ryan/Globe Staff
The parade rolled through Copley Square.
The parade rolled through Copley Square. David L. Ryan/Globe Staff
Fans cheered in downtown Boston.
Fans cheered in downtown Boston.Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff
A young fan climbed a pole to get a better view on Cambridge Street.
A young fan climbed a pole to get a better view on Cambridge Street.Maddie Meyer/Getty Images
Fans celebrated on Cambridge Street in front of Government Center Station.
Fans celebrated on Cambridge Street in front of Government Center Station.Maddie Meyer/Getty Images
The Patriots parade made its way through downtown Boston.
The Patriots parade made its way through downtown Boston.Michael Dwyer/Associated Press
Even more than a half-hour before the parade began, fans lined Boylston Street.
Even more than a half-hour before the parade began, fans lined Boylston Street.Nathan Klima for the Boston Globe
Hundreds of people waited on the Mansfield commuter rail platform ahead of the parade. However, the trains were at capacity and would pass by without picking up any additional passengers.
Hundreds of people waited on the Mansfield commuter rail platform ahead of the parade. However, the trains were at capacity and would pass by without picking up any additional passengers. Leanne Burden/Globe staff
Commuters and Patriots fans waited for the commuter boat at Hingham Tuesday morning.
Commuters and Patriots fans waited for the commuter boat at Hingham Tuesday morning.Meghan Barr/Globe Staff
The post-parade line outside North Station.
The post-parade line outside North Station.Nathan Klima for the Boston Globe

Travis Andersen of the Globe staff contributed to this report.