scorecardresearch Skip to main content

New program is launched to keep affordable housing in Boston’s South End

The $47.2 million project will renovate and preserve the affordability of 146 public housing units on West Newton and Rutland streets in the South End, Mayor Martin Walsh’s office said in a statement.Matthew J. Lee/Globe staff/File 2019

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh on Wednesday celebrated a new project that will ensure more than 140 housing units in the South End remain affordable for residents for at least the next 99 years, Walsh’s office said.

The $47.2 million project will renovate and preserve the affordability of 146 public housing units on West Newton and Rutland streets in the South End, Walsh’s office said in a statement.

“Preserving Boston’s affordable housing stock is key to ensuring that everyone who wants to live here can afford to do so,” Walsh said in a statement. “I’m proud that because of this partnership these affordable units will be preserved for hundreds of families in the South End for decades to come.”

Advertisement



The Boston Housing Authority, which currently owns the properties, will transfer ownership to Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción, a nonprofit community development organization. IBA will head the renovations, Walsh’s office said in a statement.

Through the renovations, 11 units that are currently classified as uninhabitable will be made livable. Eight other units will be changed so they are accessibility-friendly, Walsh’s office said.

Other units will receive new doors and windows, accessible ramps, and sprinkler systems, and other repairs, Walsh’s office said.

“It’s a great day for residents of the South End. As we work to upgrade our public housing units, one of our priorities is to make sure that we do not lose a single unit of affordable housing in the process,” BHA Administrator Bill McGonagle said in a statement. “This project ensures that these deeply affordable units are preserved for hundreds of families in the South End in the decades to come.”

The South End has more income-restricted units than any other Boston neighborhood, with 48 percent of its housing stock being affordable.

The properties will be changed from public housing units to long-term rental assistance units, with 110 funded through the US Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Rental Assistance Demonstration program, Walsh’s office said.

Advertisement



The other 36 other units will be funded through project-based Section 8 vouchers through the BHA.

“As living costs continue to rise across the city, we remain firmly committed to identifying new ways to expand affordable housing and empower low-income minority residents in Boston,” IBA CEO Vanessa Calderón-Rosado said in a statement.


Breanne Kovatch can be reached at breanne.kovatch@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter at @breannekovatch.