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Family identifies victim of Dorchester shooting

Chris Nunes, the father of a 20-year-old man shot to death Sunday night outside an apartment building on Columbia Road in Dorchester, bent to relight a candle at the shooting scene Monday.
Chris Nunes, the father of a 20-year-old man shot to death Sunday night outside an apartment building on Columbia Road in Dorchester, bent to relight a candle at the shooting scene Monday.Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff/Globe Staff

Chris Nunes saw his son about four days ago, when the 20-year-old dropped by his house. Nunes gave him a pair of Nikes.

“I walked him home and that was the last time I’ve seen my son,” Nunes said.

Christian Nunes Perkins, about a week shy of his 21st birthday, was killed Sunday night when a gunman opened fire in front of an apartment building on Columbia Road in Dorchester, near Geneva Avenue, police said. Another man was injured and is expected to live.

Now Nunes Perkins’s family is grieving the death of a son for a second time. An older brother, Torey Evans, was killed in 2009 near the intersection of Gallivan Boulevard and Patterson Street in Dorchester, about 2 miles away from where Nunes Perkins was gunned down.

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On Monday, Nunes Perkins’s family and friends gathered to light prayer candles at the spot where he was shot — on the street where his family had lived when he was younger.

Nunes Perkins was the youngest of six, his family said. He worked as a caretaker, cleaning the home of a man who could not do it himself, according to his father.

“My son was a good kid,” his father said. “I don’t know why this happened to him. This gotta stop. This really got to stop.”

Nunes Perkins’s mother nicknamed him Booda when he was a chubby baby and the name stuck, even as he grew into a tall, slim young man.

“He was just a very quiet person,” said his sister, Laneka Evans. He enjoyed basketball, video games, and spending time with his nieces and nephews, she said. “Very quiet. Stayed to himself.”

A shell casing found at the scene.
A shell casing found at the scene.Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff/Globe Staff

Boston police said Monday afternoon that no arrests had been made. They did not release a possible motive for the shooting.

His death is the 24th homicide this year compared with 32 at this time last year, Boston Police said.

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About 15 hours after the shooting, a family friend found a shell casing in a flower bed in front of the building on Columbia Road.

Police investigators scoured the scene on Columbia Road Monday.
Police investigators scoured the scene on Columbia Road Monday.Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff/Globe Staff

The family called police officers, who came to the scene and cordoned off a piece of the sidewalk as they documented the scene again and picked up the casing.

Tieesha Hall, a friend of Nunes Perkins’s father, said she had known the son “since he was a little boy.’’

Nunes “didn’t have a chance to say goodbye to his son. It was not like he knew his son was sick and he knew his son was going to be taken from him. . . . It’s sad,” Hall said.

Hall said her son survived a shooting a few years ago, and Nunes Perkins’s death brought back painful memories and a deep concern about gun violence in her neighborhood.

“I know how it feels to hear the only ambulance riding down the street and knowing your son was in it,” she said. “I know how it feels.”

The Sunday night shooting comes just two weeks after 22-year-old Adilson Barbosa was shot and killed about a mile away near the intersection of Columbia Road and Dudley Street.

Barbosa, whose death remains under investigation by homicide detectives, was shot around 11:37 p.m. on July 14.

“I feel that we all need to get together and we all need to say something as a community, as a black people, as a whole,” Hall said.

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“We need to tell our [Boston police] commissioner that this is what’s going on, and we’re not liking it. Not saying they are not doing anything, but we need more.”


Gal Tziperman Lotan can be reached at gal.lotan@globe.com or at 617-929-2043. John R. Ellement can be reached at ellement@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @JREbosglobe.