fb-pixel Skip to main content

‘Moose on the loose’ tranquilized in Worcester cemetery

A biologist from the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife examines the moose after it was immobilized Monday.
A biologist from the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife examines the moose after it was immobilized Monday.Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife

A moose galloping through a Worcester cemetery Monday was tranquilized by wildlife officials and taken to a state park, Worcester police said.

Massachusetts Environmental Police and the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife tranquilized the moose near the back of St John’s Cemetery at 260 Cambridge St., said Worcester Police Lieutenant Sean Murtha in a statement. The “moose on the loose” was subdued and tagged around noon, said Sue, a worker at the cemetery who declined to give her last name.

“Personnel from both MassWildlife and the Environmental Police darted it, loaded it into a truck and have taken it to more suitable habitat in another part of Worcester County. We just got a text that it is up and walking around,” said Marion E. Larson, a spokeswoman for MassWildlife.

Advertisement



Police said the animal was taken to a state park. The bull moose was about 2 or 3 years old, Larson said.

“People who were jogging saw him and called animal control. I was in the office and someone saw him out the window and said, ‘Look out, there’s a moose!’” the cemetery employee said. “He had long legs. He could trot pretty good.”

The moose was first spotted around 8 a.m. running toward a river, the cemetery said. No graves were destroyed and no one was injured.

“It was running around the whole cemetery. We had to close the cemetery down because if anyone’s out there picking up flowers or whatever, he’s pretty big so you don’t want to be out there with him,” the cemetery worker said.

MassWildlife is warning drivers in Central and Western Massachusetts to look out for moose in September and October.

“It is mating season for moose, which means they are moving around a lot more as the males (bulls) seek the females (cows),” Larson said.

Advertisement




Alyssa Lukpat can be reached at alyssa.lukpat@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @AlyssaLukpat.