Massachusetts

The 10 tall ships you can’t miss

The tall ship Eagle arrived in Boston.

Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

The tall ship Eagle arrived in Boston.

Sailors love their lore, and every ship has a story to tell. This weekend, dozens of vessels from all over the world will sail into Boston Harbor for the five-day maritime tall ships festival. Here’s a look at 10 of the ships you can’t afford to miss:

Eagle

The USCGC Eagle is the seventh US Coast Guard cutter to bear the name. Built in 1936, it was originally operated by Nazi Germany to train cadets for the German Navy. The United States took the ship as a war prize after World War II.

Bluenose II

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It’s named after a fishing and racing schooner that launched out of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, in 1921. For 17 years, the original Bluenose won the International Fishermen’s Race. Bluenose II was built by many who’d worked on the original. It serves as Nova Scotia’s sailing ambassador.

16toptenships - Picton Castle. (Sail Boston)

Sail Boston

Picton Castle

Picton Castle

This three-masted tall ship based in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, has been a fishing trawler, a WWII minesweeper in the Royal Navy, a freighter, and school room. It’s named after an 11th-century castle in Wales.

16toptenships - Europa. (Sail Boston)

Sail Boston

Europa

Europa

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The Europa was first named Senator Brockes, built in 1911 on the Stülcken wharf in Hamburg. It served as a light ship on the Elbe River in Germany. Years ago, light ships were common sights in hazardous places near river estuaries and sand banks.

Pride of Baltimore II

The Pride II has sailed nearly 200,000 miles and traveled to more than 200 ports in 40 countries. It’s a reproduction of an 1812-era topsail schooner, the type of vessel that helped win the War of 1812. The vessel was commissioned in memory of the original Pride of Baltimore, which went down near Puerto Rico in 1986, taking its captain and crew members down with it.

Oosterschelde

This three-masted schooner launched a century ago out of the Netherlands. According to its website, the Oosterschelde is the “last remaining representative of the large fleet of schooners that sailed under the Dutch flag at the beginning of the 20th century.”

BAE Guayas

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This is a training ship of the Ecuadorian Navy. Launched in 1976, it was named in honor of the river Guayas in Ecuador and the first steamship constructed in South America back in 1841.

Oliver Hazard Perry

Considered the largest civilian sailing school vessel in the nation, the SSV Oliver Hazard Perry is the first ocean-going, full-rigged ship to be built in the United States in more than 100 years. The ship is named after a US captain and Naval hero in the War of 1812 and commander of the American Naval Fleet.

16toptenships - Gulden Leeuw. (Sail Boston)

Sail Boston

Gulden Leeuw

Gulden Leeuw

The “Gulden Leeuw” or “Golden Lion” was launched in 1937 on behalf of the Danish Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. It was previously used for marine biological research and as a training ship for the Danish Nautical College.

Unión

The Peruvian Navy training ship Unión, at 90.16 meters, is the longest ship in the fleet, according to Sail Boston 2017. It’s one of the newer vessels, built in 2015, to train midshipmen and naval cadets.

Cristela Guerra can be reached at cristela.guerra@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @CristelaGuerra.
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