William Corbett, 75, poet whose South End home became a literary salon

Mr. Corbett and his wife, Beverly, moved to Brooklyn, N.Y., six years ago.

Matt Kalinowski for the Boston Globe/File

“I’m a poet of consciousness, of consciousness in the world, as it goes by,” he told the Rain Taxi Review of Books in 2005.

Latest Obituaries headlines

John Glines, 84, who helped bring ‘Torch Song’ to Broadway

Mr. Glines was committed to producing and writing plays with gay characters and gay themes that would appeal to a broad audience.

Miriam Nelson, 98, golden age dancer and choreographer

Ms. Nelson’s seven-decade career as a choreographer and dancer spanned the golden ages of Broadway, Hollywood, and television.

Morgana King, jazz singer and ‘Godfather’ actor; at 87

Before March 1972, Ms. King was known as a jazz singer with an impressive vocal range. By late that month, millions of moviegoers thought of her as Vito Corleone’s wife.

Jill Janus, singer of the metal band Huntress, dies at 43

Miss Janus fronted Huntress from the group’s inception in Los Angeles in 2009, singing on three full-length albums.

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In a photo provided by Chris Cozzone and New York Public Library's research collections, Herbert Sperling at the U.S. Penitentiary in Lewisberg, Penn., in 1994. Sperling, a convicted drug dealer from Hell’s Kitchen who was accused of ordering the execution of Vincent C. Papa, the fellow mobster who masterminded the brazen theft of 400 pounds of French Connection heroin and cocaine from a police vault, died on July 3, 2018 at a hospital near Ayer, Mass. He was 79. (Chris Cozzone/The New York Public Library's research collections via The New York Times) -- NO SALES; FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY WITH OBIT SPERLING BY SAM ROBERTS FOR AUG 16, 2018. ALL OTHER USE PROHIBITED. --

Herbert Sperling, drug boss tied to French Connection case, dies at 79

Mr. Sperling was among the first defendants to be sentenced to life imprisonment without parole, after federal judges were empowered to impose that penalty in the early 1970s.

Mr. Vajpayee (right) met Pakistani President Nawaz Sharif during peace talks in 1999. Mr. Vajpayee oversaw an end to India’s nuclear test moratorium, but also pursued peace.

Atal Bihari Vajpayee, former prime minister of India, dies at 93

Mr. Vajpayee stunned the world by ending a decades-old moratorium on nuclear weapons tests, but also managed to ease tensions with Pakistan and build closer ties to the US.

Patrick Williams, composer as heard on TV (and beyond), dies at 79

Mr. Williams wrote Grammy Award-winning arrangements as well as Emmy Award-winning scores for hit television shows, including “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.”

Aretha Franklin.

Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin dies at 76

Aretha Franklin’s prodigious vocal gifts and landmark recordings in the 1960s and early ’70s made her a voice of an era and an awe-inducing presence in American popular culture.

Norfolk, MA - 3/7/1975: Larry R. Meachum, superintendent of the Massachusetts Correctional Institution at Norfolk, talks with reporters about the recent shooting of two guards by an inmate who was allegedly under the influence of drugs in Norfolk, MA on March 7, 1975. (Jack Connolly/Globe Staff) --- BGPA Reference: 180815_BS_007

Larry R. Meachum, prison reformer who once led MCI-Norfolk, dies at 79

Mr. Meachum also oversaw prison systems in Oklahoma and Connecticut.

FILE - This Oct. 15, 2000 file photo shows Bishop Charles Grahmann in Dallas. The Catholic Diocese of Dallas says that the Most Rev. Charles Grahmann, whose 17-year tenure as bishop of the diocese was marred by one of the first church sex abuse scandals to explode into public view, has died at age 87. The diocese says in a statement that Grahmann died Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, in San Antonio following a long illness. He was the sixth bishop of the Dallas diocese and served from 1990 to 2007. (AP Photo/Staff, File)

Ex-Dallas bishop whose tenure marred by scandal dies at 87

The Most Rev. Charles Grahmann’s 17-year tenure as bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Dallas was marred by one of the first church sex abuse scandals to explode into public view.

Amber Tatro, whose lawsuit gave rights to disabled students, dies at 42

In 1979, just a few months before Amber Tatro turned 4, her family notified the Irving, Texas, school district that she would be ready for classes that fall.

Arvonne Fraser, strong voice on women’s issues, dies at 92

Ms. Fraser was, among other things, a founder of the Center on Women, Gender and Public Policy at the University of Minnesota.

Mr. Barresi’s office initiated investigations that resulted in numerous felony convictions.

Joseph Barresi, state’s first inspector general, dies at 95

While serving consecutive five-year terms from 1981 to 1991, Mr. Barresi was responsible for detecting fraud, waste, and abuse in the expenditure of public funds.

Colonel Tin hugged John McCain after testifying before a Senate committee that dealt with US prisoners of war.

Bui Tin, 90, colonel who accepted South Vietnam’s surrender

Colonel Tin had a prominent role in the Vietnam War’s final moments but later fled the country and became an unlikely critic of its ruling Communist Party.

Mr. Karunanidhi positions brought him popularity among India’s lower castes.

Muthuvel Karunanidhi, 94, screenwriter turned politician

Mr. Karunanidhi parlayed his vocation as a prolific writer of films about the downtrodden into a political career that challenged the upper caste’s hold on Indian politics.

Mr. Sipe died last week in San Diego at the age of 85.

Appreciation

Richard Sipe helped uncover pattern of clergy sex abuse

Sipe, who died Wednesday, explained that the clergy abuse horrors the Globe’s Spotlight team was discovering were quite likely part of a pattern throughout the church.

Robert Ellis Smith, 77, lawyer who published journal on privacy

Mr. Smith, a Providence resident who worked at the Harvard Crimson as an undergrad, also published and edited a newspaper covering the civil rights movement in the South.

V.S. Naipaul, shown in 2001, published more than two dozen volumes.

V.S. Naipaul, 85, fiery novelist and Nobel laureate

Mr. Naipaul penned comic masterpieces of island life before turning to the larger world, authoring richly detailed works on postcolonial states.

Dr. Robert Newman, assistant health commissioner for New York City, pictured in 2002.

Dr. Robert Newman, 80, apostle of methadone treatment

Dr. Newman pioneered methadone maintenance as a safe substitute for heroin and struggled to redefine addiction as a chronic medical condition that cannot be cured.

Arsène Tchakarian at his home in Vitry-sur-Seine, a suburb of Paris, in 2011.

Arsène Tchakarian, World War II resistance fighter in France, dies at 101

Mr. Tchakarian was the last surviving member of the Armenian-led Manouchian network.

Robert Silman engineered a solution to keep the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed house from collapsing.

Robert Silman, 83, engineer who saved Fallingwater

Robert Silman, a structural engineer who rescued Frank Lloyd Wright’s cantilevered Fallingwater in Pennsylvania from the edge of collapse, and preserved dozens of other landmarks, died July 31 at his home in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He was 83.

Carol Hulsizer, who worked with Action for Children’s Television, dies at 91

Ms. Hulsizer used humor and wit to transform complex thoughts and intricate policies into fluid prose.

Larry and Lorrie Collins dressed in flashy Western wear. Their visually captivating performances were well-suited to television variety shows.

Lorrie Collins, dynamic rockabilly singer, dies at 76

She and her brother Larry performed and recorded as the Collins Kids.

FILE - In this Nov. 17, 2013 file photo, Jarrod Lyle of Australia tees off during the final round of the Australian Masters golf tournament at Royal Melbourne Golf Club in Melbourne. Lyle has died after a long struggle with cancer. He was 36.

Jarrod Lyle, Australian golfer, dies at 36

Jarrod Lyle was an Australian professional golfer who had five top-10 finishes on the PGA Tour only to have his playing career interrupted by recurring bouts of cancer.

10guscott -- obit photo of Cecil Guscott (Handout)

Cecil Guscott, developer who was part of legendary trio of brothers, dies at 94

Cecil Guscott was a developer and was part of legendary trio of brothers who worked to revitalize Roxbury.

Dave Swearingen, former AP chief of bureau in New Hampshire and editor in Maine, dies at 73

Dave Swearingen, a former Associated Press bureau chief who led coverage of Indiana’s first execution in more than two decades and the arrests of more than 1,000 demonstrators at the Seabrook nuclear power plant in New Hampshire, has died at age 73.

FILE-- Joël Robuchon at his restaurant L’Atelier de Joel Robuchon in the Meatpacking District in Manhattan, Oct. 23, 2017. Robuchon, who died on Aug. 6, 2018, at 73, came closer than anyone to mastering a formula for winning Michelin stars. (Sasha Maslov/The New York Times)

Joël Robuchon, French chef who revolutionized haute cuisine, dies at 73

Joël Robuchon was an endlessly inventive French chef who earned a record number of Michelin stars by recasting French haute cuisine in a personal style.

Christopher Gibbs, avatar of ‘Swinging London,’ dies at 80

The erudite London antiques dealer and dandy introduced the raffish “distressed bohemian” style to interior design and helped start the Peacock Revolution in menswear.

Boston, Ma., 09/16/13, Charles W Collier, cq, a retired senior philanthropic adviser at Harvard University, was diagnosed in 2008 with Alzheimer's Disease. He is a volunteer with Cure Alzheimer's Fund, and is just finishing up a clinical trial at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He gives public presentations on the disease. Section: G Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

Charles W. Collier, a philanthropic adviser who considered adversity ‘a gift,’ dies at 70

Mr. Collier made public his diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s to encourage discussion about the illness.

Antonio Dias, Brazilian painter’s bold work needled dictators, dies at 74

In many of his canvases, Mr. Dias made use principally of red, white, and black, which gave them a violent graphic immediacy.

Mr. Mikita shielded the puck from the Detroit Red Wings’ Ted Lindsay.

Stan Mikita, who led Blackhawks to 1961 Stanley Cup title, dies at 78

Mr. Mikita and fellow Hall of Famer Bobby Hull teamed up to revive a long-floundering franchise in the 1960s.

Mr. Laxalt served as governor of Nevada and two-term senator.

Paul D. Laxalt, Nevada governor and influential Reagan adviser, dies at 96

Mr. Laxalt was one dubbed President Reagan’s “first friend.”

Tomasz Stanko, ruminative jazz trumpeter, dies at 76

Mr. Stanko’s even-toned, languorous trumpet playing endeared him to experimental musicians on both sides of the Atlantic.

Mr. Ntshona shared a 1975 Tony for his performance in two antiapartheid dramas.

Winston Ntshona, 76, Tony-winning South African actor

Mr. Ntshona was honored for his performances on Broadway in two short antiapartheid dramas, and that later led to his imprisonment.

Ms. Rae played a warmhearted housemother in the popular ’80s sitcoms.

Charlotte Rae, 92, star of ‘The Facts of Life’ and ‘Diff’rent Strokes’

Ms. Rae was a fixture on Broadway and television for six decades and found her greatest success in sitcoms.

Nancy Tuckerman (center) looked on as Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis played a a board game with Roger Tuckerman, Ms. Tuckerman’s brother. At rear was Letitia Baldridge, who had preceded Ms. Tuckerman as social secretary to the first lady.

Nancy Tuckerman, 89, Jacqueline Kennedy’s trusted aide

Ms. Tuckerman, a lifelong friend of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, served as her spokeswoman until her death in 1994.

Senator Edward Kennedy gave Ms. Heckler, his former colleague, an Irish flag at her confirmation hearing as ambassador.

Margaret M. Heckler, former US health services chief and ambassador to Ireland, dies at 87

The former diplomat and eight-term Massachusetts congresswoman championed HIV awareness and women’s rights.

Ms. Rae played a warmhearted housemother in the popular ’80s sitcoms.

Charlotte Rae, 92, star of ‘The Facts of Life’ and ‘Diff’rent Strokes’

Ms. Rae was a fixture on Broadway and television for six decades and found her greatest success in sitcoms.

Mr. Martin was able to bail out after he was hit by antiaircraft fire. Weeks later, he returned to Allied lines.

Robert Martin, 99, Tuskegee Airman who flew ‘63 and a half’ combat missions

Mr. Martin was shot down over German-occupied territory and spent five weeks trying to return to Allied lines with the help of Josip Broz Tito’s antifascist Yugoslav partisans.

H.F. Lenfest, former media mogul, philanthropist, dies

Mr. Lenfest made a $1 billion fortune in the cable industry and gave almost all of it away, supporting schools, museums, journalism, and the arts in Philadelphia and beyond.

Ms. Carlisle with Bob Hope (left) and Bing Crosby in 1937. Ms. Carlisle made 50 movies from 1932 to 1939, including three musicals opposite Crosby.

Mary Carlisle; played ingénues in Depression-era movies; at 104

From 1932 to 1939, when she was in her late teens and early 20s, Ms. Carlisle made 50 movies.

12/11/01 globe staff photo by David l Ryan Boston...94 Beacon St home of Dick Concannon and Smoki Bacon Library Tag 12202001 LIFE AT HOME Library Tag 07252004 Boston Insider

Richard Concannon, who cohosted ‘The Literati Scene’ with his wife, Smoki Bacon, dies at 89

For years, Mr. Concannon cohosted the cable TV show with Ms. Bacon.

Mr. Wirtz designed gardens for private residences, large estates, public parks, museums, college campuses, and more.

Jacques Wirtz, 93, innovative landscape designer

The acclaimed Belgian landscape architect’s innovative gardens blended sculptural treatment of boxwood and yew hedges with a deep knowledge of plants and flowers.

Mr. Genest modeled for French designer Thierry Mugler during a fashion show in Paris in 2011.

Rick Genest, Lady Gaga collaborator known as Zombie Boy, dies at 32

The Quebec model was known for his head-to-toe tattoos and participation in the Lady Gaga music video ‘‘Born This Way.’’

Patricia Hermes, 82, whose children’s books had serious side

The author’s books for children and young adults often dealt with serious subjects, including death, incest, war, famine, and slavery.

Mr. Grindstaff helped to bring the Starship Enterprise to life, from the whoosh of doors to the wail of sirens.

Douglas Grindstaff, 87, ‘Star Trek’ sound whiz

The sound editor was pivotal in the creation of the indelible whistles, beeps, and hums in the original “Star Trek” television series.

Betty Miles, her children’s books tackled sexism, dies at 90

Ms. Miles’s books addressed real-life issues like sexism, racism, and censorship after she had emerged from the 1950s to become a feminist.

Dr. Cohen found correlations between parenting styles and mental health.

Patricia Cohen, tracked mental health of children, dies at 81

Dr. Cohen detailed the natural history of psychiatric problems and helped to create a framework for future long-term studies.