Latest Obituaries headlines

Leonard Silverstein, tax expert, lawyer, benefactor of arts

Leonard Silverstein was a Washington-based lawyer and arts patron who started a series of prominent tax-law guidebooks.

Joseph L. Burgoyne III, a Waltham businessman and booster who was a friend to all, dies at 62

Joseph L. Burgoyne III helped run Ideal Concrete Block Co., his family’s longtime business, and was civic booster and friend to all.

Günter Blobel, 81, Nobel laureate who found cell ‘ZIP codes’

Dr. Blobel’s achievement was a fundamental step on the road to improved health.

Ursula Bailey Marvin, 96, groundbreaking geologist

Dr. Marvin studied lunar rocks and meteorites in Antarctica and was a researcher at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

Ben Agajanian, 98, place-kicking pioneer

Mr. Agajanian, who was known as the pro football’s first career kicking specialist, played 13 seasons with a specially designed square-toe shoe after four of his toes were severed.

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First lady Nancy Reagan and US Ambassador John Gavin (left) viewed earthquake damage in Mexico City in 1985.

John Gavin, 86, Hollywood actor who served as US ambassador to Mexico

Mr. Gavin had major roles in the Roman epic ‘‘Spartacus’’ and Alfred Hitchcock’s classic thriller ‘‘Psycho.’’

Mr. Polchinski was a giant force in the development of string theory.

Joseph Polchinski, 63, leading theorist on multiple universes

Mr. Polchinski’s work helped lay the mathematical foundation for the proposition that our universe is only one in an almost endless assemblage.

As an author, Mr. Bennett chronicled civil rights.

Lerone Bennett Jr., 89, former editor of Ebony magazine

Mr. Bennett also took on national roles, including as a member of President Bill Clinton’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities.

Miss Wing in her office in 1963, her first year as director of Winsor School.

Virginia Wing, 94, fifth leader of Winsor School

Miss Wing’s belief in single-sex education helped keep Winsor an all-girls school in Boston.

In a photo provided by the Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Donald Lynden-Bell in 2008. Lynden-Bell, a British theoretical astrophysicist who pioneered research into cosmic quirks like quasars and black holes and with colleagues contradicted the prevailing premise that the universe is expanding evenly, died on Feb. 6, 2018, at his home in Cambridge, England. He was 82. (Amanda Smith/Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge via The New York Times) -- NO SALES; FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY WITH NYT STORY OBIT LYNDENBELL BY SAM ROBERTS FOR FEB. 14, 2018. ALL OTHER USE PROHIBITED. --

Donald Lynden-Bell, quasar and black hole expert; at 82

Dr. Lynden-Bell’s research contradicted the prevailing premise that the universe is expanding evenly.

Ms. Maxwell (right) performed with Rosemary Harris in “The Royal Family” in 2009. She was nominated for a Tony Award for her role. in the play.

Jan Maxwell, 61, acclaimed stage actress

The fiercely passionate, adoringly reviewed New York stage actress earned five Tony Award nominations in seven years.

(FILES) In this file photo taken on August 3, 2010 Former CDA (Christian Democrat party) Prime Minister Ruud Lubbers gives a press conference on a report he gave earlier to Dutch Queen Beatrix in The Hague. Ruud Lubbers, the longest-serving prime minister ever of the Netherlands and a former UN high commissioner for refugees, died on February 14, 2018, the Dutch government announced. He was 78. / AFP PHOTO / ANP / VALERIE KUYPERSVALERIE KUYPERS/AFP/Getty Images

Ruud Lubbers, 78; Dutch leader lauded for boosting economy

Mr. Lubbers, who played a key role in the foundation of the European Union, led the Netherlands through economic turmoil to prosperity.

John “Tito” Francona (right) threw the ceremonial first pitch before the start of the AL Division Series in Cleveland against the Boston Red Sox in 2016. His son, Terry, manager of the Indians, joined him for the moment.

John ‘Tito’ Francona, at 84; father of former Sox manager

Mr. Francona was a journeyman for much of his career, but had a productive string of six seasons with the Cleveland Indians.

Mrs. Frustaci and Sam Frustaci with their three surviving septuplets in 1988.

Woman who got attention by giving birth to septuplets dies

Patricia Frustaci made national headlines in 1985 when she gave birth to seven children.

Jack Hynes, 88, died Tuesday in Hingham.

Jack Hynes, dean of Boston TV news, dies at 88

Mr. Hynes spent nearly 50 years working in Boston television as an anchorman at Channels 5 and 56.

Mr. Tsvangirai served as prime minister in Zimbabwe for four years.

Morgan Tsvangirai; fought to free Zimbabwe from dictator

Mr. Tsvangirai rose from the nickel mines to become a leader in the nation’s pro-democracy movement.

Dr. Guthrie forged the way for women to be added to Episcopal Divinity School’s faculty in Cambridge.

Rev. Harvey Guthrie Jr., whose ‘Gospel blackmail’ opened seminary to ordained female faculty, dies at 93

The Rev. Guthrie, then dean of Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, threatened to resign in 1974 if the board didn’t hire an ordained Anglican woman to the faculty.

Mr. Allen (left) joined Steve Rossi in comedic routines on stage and television.

Marty Allen, wild-eyed comedy star; at 95

Mr. Allen and crooner Steve Rossi formed one of the most successful comedy teams of the 1960s.

Jack Hynes held court with former Channel 56 colleages in December 2006. Hynes also worked for an extended period at Channel 5.

Jack Hynes, dean of Boston TV news, dies at 88

Hynes, the son of former Boston mayor John Hynes, was known as the dean of Boston TV news during his decades-long career.

St. Louis Cardinals players Wally Moon (left) and Stan Musial flanked Milwaukee Braves outfielder Hank Aaron.

Wally Moon, 87; his homers helped the Dodgers win a World Series

Mr. Moon lofted “moon shot” home runs over the short left-field screen at the Los Angeles Coliseum during the early years of the LA Dodgers.

Mr. Damone was married several times, including to actress Diahann Carroll.

Vic Damone, 89, popular 1950s crooner and nightclub star

Mr. Damone’s creamy baritone and heartthrob good looks propelled his success at the jukebox and on-screen in after World War II.

Leon ‘Ndugu’ Chancler, 65, versatile drummer

Mr. Chancler‘s crisp grooves and pinpoint fireworks of syncopation were heard on hundreds of albums, including Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.”

Asma Jahangir, fearless Pakistani rights activist; at 66

Ms. Jahangir had a reputation of speaking truth to power and defending the weak and the marginalized, women and minorities against injustice.

Dr. Isadore Rosenfeld, 91, high-profile cardiologist

Dr. Rosenfeld was a media-savvy New York physician who dispensed medical advice in best-selling books, in magazine articles, and on television.

Mr. Barlow’s affinity for open spaces and free expression made him a leading defender of an unfettered Internet.

John Perry Barlow, 70; championed an unfettered Internet

Mr. Barlow was also a former cowpoke, Republican politician, and lyricist for the Grateful Dead.

Mr. Kelley was a member of the 85th Fighter Squadron that trained at what is now Hanscom Air Force Base in Bedford.

Robert Kelley, 97, of Hudson, highly decorated World War II fighter pilot

Mr. Kelley was awarded a Purple Heart for the broken back and other injuries he suffered in the war.

Reg E. Cathey, actor in House of Cards and The Wire, died on Friday.

Reg E. Cathey, 59, actor on ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’

Mr. Cathey’s portrayal of Freddy Hayes in “House of Cards” earned him three Emmy nominations and one win.

Dr. Sidel was a founding member of Physicians for Social Responsibility.

Dr. Victor Sidel, public health champion, dies at 86

Dr. Sidel’s concerns ranged from alleviating the effects of poverty in the Bronx to raising alarms about the potential impact of nuclear war.

Mr. Jones portrayed the character Rodney “Hot Rod” Dunham in the show “Justified.”

‘Justified,’ ‘Home Improvement’ actor Mickey Jones; at 76

Mr. Jones was a veteran character actor who worked steadily in television from the 1970s.

Ms. Bolen on the set of the soap opera “The Doctors,” in New York in October 1972.

Lin Bolen, energetic NBC executive who broke a glass ceiling

As the executive in charge of NBC’s daytime programming in the early 1970s, Ms. Bolen was the highest-ranking woman in television.

The Rev. Colapietro spent most of his career at Holy Cross Roman Catholic Church on West 42nd Street.

Peter Colapietro, ‘saloon priest’ who ministered to lowly and mighty; at 69

The Rev. Colapietro’s presence at celebrity hangouts contrasted with his low-key work in Manhattan parishes.

Mrs. Jeghelian was a talk show host on WBZ before moving to WRKO.

Janet Jeghelian, 83, pioneering talk radio show host

Mrs. Jeghelian also ran for the US Senate, US House, and lieutenant governor.

Mr. Weiss’s suits sometimes led to more transparent corporate bookkeeping and greater accountability.

Melvyn Weiss, 82, lawyer who fought corporate fraud

Mr. Weiss’s avalanche of class-action lawsuits made him a pariah to corporate America and a hero to plaintiffs.

Dr. Baker wrote: “One of my goals in philosophy is to understand the common world that we all encounter.”

Lynne Rudder Baker, philosophy professor at UMass Amherst, dies at 73

Dr. Baker taught at the university from 1989 until 2013.

Richard Leghorn was awarded a Silver Star for WWII reconnaissance flights over Germany.

Richard Leghorn, 98, pioneer of Cold War aerial espionage photography

Mr. Leghorn cofounded Itek Corp., a Lexington-based company that participated in a then-secret spy satellite program called Corona.

Mr. Mahoney played a disabled former policeman who often quarreled with Frasier, played by Kelsey Grammer.

John Mahoney, 77; played cranky dad on ‘Frasier’

Mr. Mahoney’s character was a blue-collar man who played counterpoint to pompous sons Frasier and Niles Crane.

Mr. Coen introduced urban children to the wonders of acting.

Larry Coen, 59, versatile comic actor-writer-director and City Stage mainstay

Mr. Coen’s scores of credits included productions with the Beau Jest Moving Theatre, the Lyric Stage Company of Boston, and Shakespeare plays on the Common.

Richard ‘Kirk’ Bowden, 82; protected civil rights figures as a US marshal

Mr. Bowden provided security at the 1963 March on Washington and for James Meredith, the first African-American student at the University of Mississippi.

Mr. Edwards (second from right) with group members (from left) Otis Williams, Richard Street, Melvin Franklin, and Glenn Beonard.

Dennis Edwards, 74, Temptations singer

Mr. Edwards replaced founding member David Ruffin in 1968, and his soulful, passionate voice defined the group for years.

Robert McCormick Adams, 91, former Smithsonian chief

Mr. Adams, who led the Smithsonian Institution into era of “confrontation, experimentation, and debate,’’ died Jan. 27 in Chula Vista, Calif.

Mr. Gouri was often described as the last of Israel’s national poets.

Haim Gouri, 94, poetic voice of a rising Israel

Mr. Gouri was also a journalist, author, and documentary filmmaker.

Mr. Pope’s son Jeff said that his dad never wanted to be in the public spotlight.

John D. Pope, 86, longtime owner of F.W. Webb Co.

Mr. Pope took over the regional plumbing and heating supplies company after his father’s death.

Mr. Huntsman and his family have donated more than $1.4 billion, including to a cancer institute that bears his name.

Jon Huntsman Sr., 80, Utah billionaire and philanthropist

Mr. Huntsman overcame poverty to become one of the state’s most successful and powerful people.

Mr. Zorich (in Jeep) and his wife, Olympia Dukakis, starred in Aeschylus’s “Agamemnon’’ at the John Jay College Theater in New York in 2004.

Louis Zorich, 93, theater veteran, ‘Mad About You’ actor

Mr. Zorich, a Tony Award-nominated actor, played the father of Paul Reiser’s character on the NBC sitcom.

Gene Sharp of Boston's Albert Einstein Institute, the

Gene Sharp, at 90; founded Albert Einstein Institution and promoted nonviolent opposition to tyranny

Dr. Sharp has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in the past, but he tended to shrug off accolades.

In this 1974 file photo, Cleveland Indians baseball player Oscar Gamble poses. Gamble, an outfielder who hit 200 home runs over 17 major league seasons, died Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2018, of a rare tumor of the jaw. He was 68. (AP Photo/RHH, File)

Oscar Gamble, outfielder who played for 7 big league teams, 68

Oscar Gamble was an outfielder who hit 200 home runs over 17 major league seasons and was famous during his playing days for an Afro that spilled out of his helmet.