South

Letter: Ample evidence linking turbines to health issues

One of the owners of Scituate’s new wind turbine, Gordon L. Deanne of Palmer Financial, said recently there is no evidence linking wind turbines to human health problems. He speculated that the people who are getting sick near turbines may be falling victim to mind tricks. He added that people can be annoyed, but that “annoyance is not a health effect.”

A number of sources counter his opinion. “Annoyance, in medical usage, exists as a precise technical term and defines annoyance as a mental state capable of degrading health”; “. . . physiological reactions to sound annoyance include increased heart rate, increased blood pressure, hypertension, hearing impairment, tinnitus. . . ”

Advertisement

There is a complete disregard by developers for, and lack of research by decision-makers about, proper industrial wind turbine placement close to humans before permits are granted. Err on the side of caution until the proper scientific research is completed. Until and unless the developers, manufacturers, our city, state, and national leaders can guarantee that industrial wind turbines are not hazardous to one’s health, a moratorium is necessary.

Vestas, a manufacturer of industrial wind turbines, states in its safety manual: “DO NOT stay within a radius of 1,300 feet from the turbine” and “Make sure that children do not stay by or play nearby the turbine. If necessary, fence the foundation.” Those warnings by the manufacturer are not the “green” we embraced or envisioned for our future.

Most European countries require a 6,510-foot setback from buildings; in France, people are not allowed within 1,625 feet of a turbine. Here, Scituate’s is 300 feet from the nearest home, Fairhaven’s 950 feet from occupied space.

Unforgivable and indefensible oversight on too many fronts.

Marie Stamos

Quincy

Loading comments...
You're reading  1 of 5 free articles.
Get UNLIMITED access for only 99¢ per week Subscribe Now >
You're reading1 of 5 free articles.Keep scrolling to see more articles recomended for you Subscribe now
We hope you've enjoyed your 5 free articles.
Continue reading by subscribing to Globe.com for just 99¢.
 Already a member? Log in Home
Subscriber Log In

We hope you've enjoyed your 5 free articles'

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Already a subscriber?
Your city. Your stories. Your Globe.
Yours FREE for two weeks.
Enjoy free unlimited access to Globe.com for the next two weeks.
Limited time only - No credit card required!
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.
Thanks & Welcome to Globe.com
You now have unlimited access for the next two weeks.
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.