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    BLOTTER TALES

    Police continue to chase Pokémon Go

    Bangkok,Thailand - October 30, 2014: Pickachu toy character from Pokemon anime. There are toy sold as part of McDonald Happy Meal toy.; Shutterstock ID 227009044; PO: 0722Weekend
    Shutterstock / Nicescene
    Pokémon’s Pickachu character.

    Every day, police officers respond to reports of all sorts of events and nonevents, most of which never make the news. Here is a sampling of lesser-known — but no less noteworthy — incidents from police log books (a.k.a. blotters) in our suburbs.

    POKÉMON GO: STILL A THING

    The augmented reality game Pokémon Go still has people wandering the streets with their smartphones at all hours of the day and night, with police sometimes alerted to their comings and goings. At 2:03 a.m. May 6, for example, Burlington police checked on a suspicious vehicle seen in Chestnut Hill Cemetery on Bedford Street. Just before 1 a.m. June 16, Franklin police found a man sitting in a vehicle at a shopping plaza parking lot at 270 Franklin Village Drive.Both nocturnal types were Pokémon Go players whom officers asked to move along. Two days later, Hopkinton police checked on a vehicle on Main Street. Again, the log entry told the same tale: “Looking for Pokémon.” At 9:27 p.m. July 5, Milford police responded to a motion alarm going off behind an office building on Water Street, set off, it turned out, by two people in a vehicle playing the game. In Stow, it seems the game can really draw a crowd. At 6 p.m. July 24, police there stopped to check on a group of 15 people congregating under a tree on the lower common on Great Road. Pokémon Go players, of course, whom police asked to disperse.

    THIS LITTLE PIGGY WAS SAVED

    On July 12, Raynham police and fire were asked to assist a person locked out of a vehicle outside a veterinary hospital on South Street. Time was of the essence because a pet pig was locked inside. Police Chief James Donovan rode to the rescue. “Yes, it was a pet pig,” he said in an e-mail to the Globe, “and I was able to unlock the car before the [fire department] arrived.”

    SAY IT WITH DEAD FLOWERS

    It’s summertime, and nature is in full flower — except, that is, where the flower vandals abide. It happened to a Wakefield resident on the Fourth of July, according to a report filed with police the next day. Not the first time either, the resident reported, and there was something of an extenuating circumstance in that the “flowers” were plastic. It happened in Norwood July 28, according to an Edgehill Road resident who reported that someone cut her flowers down. And it was reported in Beverly July 12 by a resident who reported that while he was away, someone cut several of his flowers and shrubs, killing some of them. This particular complainant had suspects in mind — his neighbor and her boyfriend, whom he said he caught messing with his plants in the past. According to the log entry, the officer spoke to the neighbor, “who denied any participation in the pruning, other than what grows over the property line onto her side.” The officer further reported that the damage “was clearly from someone reaching into or walking onto [the] victim’s property.” The victim was advised to talk with his neighbors and invest in a security camera to document any future incidents.

    SOME PEOPLE NEVER LEARN

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    At 8:12 p.m. July 11 a police officer and sergeant were on Derby Street in Salem when a woman came running over to them, waving her arms and yelling, “The guy’s drunk, he almost killed us.” She pointed to a blue Dodge parked nearby that had a flat tire and damage to its left front and side, then to the car’s alleged driver. He proved to be a 55-year-old Salem man who according to the police log entry had previously been convicted of operating under the influence 10 times and for driving after his license had been revoked 12 times. Indeed, police said, it was currently revoked, and officers found that he was carrying Lorazepam, which is used to treat anxiety and other disorders, in a clear plastic bag. After administering field sobriety tests, police charged him with operating under the influence (11th and subsequent offense), operating after revocation (13th and subsequent offense), and illegal possession of a Class C controlled substance.

    Emily Sweeney can be reached at esweeney@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @emilysweeney.