10 years after Hurricane Katrina

President Obama visited New Orleans today to mark progress the city has made before the upcoming anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which ravaged the Gulf Coast 10 years ago. The category 3 storm packed 125-mile-per-hour winds, killed some 2,000 people, caused massive flooding, and was the costliest natural disaster to hit the United States. (Big Picture 2010 post )--By Lloyd Young
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Reuters photographer Carlos Barria holds a print of a photograph he took in 2005, as he matches it up at the same location 10 years later in New Orleans, La., on Aug. 17,. The print shows a woman arriving with her dog at a collection point for victims of Hurricane Katrina, Sept. 8, 2005. Hurricane Katrina triggered floods that inundated New Orleans in 2005. Congress authorized spending more than $14 billion to beef up the city's flood protection after Katrina and built a series of new barriers that include manmade islands and new wetlands. (Carlos Barria/Reuters)
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Carlos Barria holds a print of a photograph he took in 2005, as he matches it up at the same location showing coffins removed from tombs, Sept. 10, 2005, after Hurricane Katrina struck causing major flooding. (Carlos Barria/Reuters)
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Photographer Carlos Barria holds a print of a photograph he took in 2005, as he matches it up showing Joshua Creek sitting on the porch of his house on Sept. 13, 2005. (Carlos Barria/Reuters)
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President Obama chats with local residents of an area reconstructed after Hurricane Katrina, accompanied by New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu in New Orleans, La., on Aug. 27. Obama highlighted the "structural inequality" that hurt poor black people in New Orleans before the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, during a visit to celebrate the city's progress 10 years after the storm. (Carlos Barria/Reuters)
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A flag on a presidential limo can be seen as President Obama greets a resident in the the Tremé neighborhood in New Orleans on Aug. 27 for the 10th anniversary since the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. Tremé is one of the oldest black neighborhoods in America, which borders the French Quarter just north of Downtown. (Andrew Harnik/Associated Press)
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A wrecked ship remains from Hurricane Katrina flooding near a wetlands area on Aug. 24 in New Orleans. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed some 2000, is considered the costliest natural disaster in US history . (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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The $1.1 billion Lake Borgne Surge Barrier stands on Aug. 24 in New Orleans. The massive structure was built by the Army Corps of Engineers along with other reinforcements to defend the city against future hurricanes and has been dubbed by some as the 'Great Wall' of New Orleans. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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Structures stand along deterioring wetlands on Aug. 25 in Plaquemines Parish. Louisiana is currently losing its wetlands at a rate of one football field per hour. Wetlands act as a storm buffer and their diminished size was a major contributing factor to the force with which Hurricane Katrina's storm surge hit New Orleans. The state is implementing efforts to restore the wetlands. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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People stand atop a levee on the Mississippi River in the Lower Ninth Ward on Aug. 26 in New Orleans. New Orleans is ringed by hundred of miles of levees to protect against flooding. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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In this combination of images, (top) evacuees sit outside the Superdome in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina on Sept. 2, 2005 and the same area on Aug. 17. Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina swept buildings off their foundations and deluged nearly all of New Orleans with floodwaters which rose so fast some people drowned in their homes. Those who made it to their rooftops or the relative safety of dry land waited days to be rescued as the Big Easy descended into chaos. Today, colorful homes on stilts have replaced many of the rotting hulks left behind after the low-lying coastal city in the southern United States was finally drained. (James Nielson/AFP/Getty Images(TOP) and Lee Celano/AFP/Getty Images)
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In this composite image, (top) homes and vacant lots stand in the Lower Ninth Ward in front of the Industrial Canal (center) and downtown New Orleans (top left) on Aug. 24. The devastated Lower Ninth Ward (bottom photo) is seen in front of the Industrial Canal with the city skyline in the background. The area was one of the most heavily devastated areas of the city following a levee breach along the Industrial Canal during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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In this composite image, (top photo) Brian Mollere sits with a box holding the remains of his dog Rocky on the porch of the home he rebuilt on the slab of his former home after Hurricane Katrina destroyed the house on Aug. 26 in Waveland, Miss. Mollere (bottom photo) holds his dog Rocky as he sits at a table in a makeshift shelter that he erected over the remains of his home that was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina on Sept 3, 2005. His mother, who also tried to ride the storm, was killed in the home. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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In this combination of images, (left) residents attempt to escape flood waters on Aug. 31, 2005 in New Orleans and an image (right) of the rebuilt businesses on Canal Street are seen on Aug. 16 at the ten year anniversary of the devastating storm. Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina swept buildings off their foundations and deluged nearly all of New Orleans with floodwaters which rose so fast some people drowned in their homes. Those who made it to their rooftops or the relative safety of dry land waited days to be rescued as the Big Easy descended into chaos. Today, colorful homes on stilts have replaced many of the rotting hulks left behind after the low-lying coastal city in the southern United States was finally drained. (James Nielson/AFP/Getty Images(TOP) and Lee Celano/AFP/Getty Images)
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A man is reflected in the New Orleans Katrina Memorial on Aug. 23. A decade after one of the most deadly storms in US history, Hurricane Katrina's forgotten victims lie in 83 caskets entombed in black granite mausoleums behind the gothic gates of a New Orleans cemetery. On Saturday, 10 years to the day after Katrina's devastating landfall in Louisiana, city dignitaries will gather at the burial site, known as the Hurricane Katrina Memorial. Viewed from above, it resembles the shape of a hurricane. (Jonathan Bachman/Reuters)
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A small plant grows behind a window of a destroyed home in the Lower Ninth Ward on Aug. 24. The area was one of the most heavily devastated areas of the city following a levee breach during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Much of the area has yet to be rebuilt. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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Cheryl Nicks, left, and Burnell Cotlon high-five after a historic plaque is unveiled during a ceremony at Jourdan Avenue and North Johnson Street on Aug. 24. The marker tells the story of the area flooding during Hurricane Katrina, which hit New Orleans nearly a decade ago. (David Grunfeld/NOLA.com The Times-Picayune via Associated Press)
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Running Bear Boxing Club owner Harry Sims whispers advice to a young boxer in front of the boxing ring built next to his home in the Lower Ninth Ward on Aug. 20. The outdoor boxing club was destroyed during Hurricane Katrina and it took about three years for Sims to be able to reuild the club. A number of youngsters train there on afternoons after school. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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Young boxers train at the Running Bear Boxing Club, built by Harry Sims next to his home in the Lower Ninth Ward on Aug. 20 in New Orleans. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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An overgrown stop sign stands in the Lower Ninth Ward on Aug. 24. The area was one of the most heavily devastated areas of the city following a levee breach during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Much of the area has yet to be rebuilt. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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Serenity Murdock, 9, and her little brother, King, awake before sunrise on the first day of school to board a bus to KIPP Believe Primary School, a, 18-mile trip from home, in Eastern New Orleans, on Aug. 3. The customary neighborhood school is more or less a thing of the past here. Parents apply through a citywide lottery to scores of schools runs by dozens of boards; there are at least 15 different first days of public school across New Orleans. (Margaret Cheatham Williams/The New York Times)
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The Hot 8 Brass Band performs at the Howling Wolf in New Orleans on Aug. 16. The vibrant sounds of brass bands and buskers echo through the streets of New Orleans ten years after the birthplace of jazz was devastated by Hurricane Katrina. But while tourists may find themselves overwhelmed by choice, locals fear some of the Big Easy's spirit of creativity and improvisation may have been lost to the floodwaters. (Lee Celano/AFP/Getty Images)
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People gather at a music club on Frenchmen Street, a live music area traditionally known by locals but now popular with tourists on Aug. 21. The tourism industry has rebounded strongly in the city following Katrina and last year the city had nearly as many visitors as the year before the storm. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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A cross dangles from a revelers neck during the Valley of the Silent Men second line parade on Aug. 23. Traditional second line parades are put on by social aid and pleasure clubs organized by neighborhood in New Orleans. The parades represent a history of solidarity, empowerment and cultural pride within the African-American enclaves of the city. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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A couple dances to Guitar Lightnin' Lee and His Thunder Band at a Bywater bar in New Orleans on Aug. 18. (Lee Celano/AFP/Getty Images)
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Decorated shrimp boats line up at the blessing of the fleet in Delacroix Island, La., on Aug. 8. It was the first blessing of the fleet since the coastal fishing and shrimping community was devastated by Hurricane Katrina nearly ten years ago. (Gerald Herbert/Associated Press)
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A Dutch volunteer helps rebuild a heavily damaged home in the Lower Ninth Ward on Aug. 24. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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New homes stand next to vacant lots in the Lower Ninth Ward on Aug. 26 in New Orleans. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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The remnants of a home destroyed by Hurricane Katrina sits on a lot for sale on Deslonde Street in the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans Aug. 17. People who talk about a renaissance in the city speak in the same breath about those didn't recover. The "New" New Orleans is whiter and more expensive to live in. African-American neighborhoods across the city still struggle, especially the chronically neglected Lower 9th Ward, a center of black home ownership before the floodwalls failed. And the murder rate is rising again. (Max Becherer/Associated Press)
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A photo provided by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development shows the B.W. Cooper Housing development, known as the Calliope, in New Orleans in November of 2005. The complex was a public housing nightmare before Katrina, notorious for shoddy maintenance, residents, poor health and shockingly high levels of violence. In its place today is the far-prettier Yvonne Marrero Commons, but not everyone is back. (US Department of Housing and Urban Development via The New York Times)
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Rodney Lavalais, 29, who lived in the B.W. Cooper Housing development, also called the Calliope, stands in front of a townhouse where the complex used to be in New Orleans on July 12. (William Widmer/The New York Times)
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Steps lead to the empty foundation of a home destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in the Lower Ninth Ward on Forstall Street in New Orleans, just behind a new charter high school being built in the neighborhood on Aug. 17. Ironically, the fact that many homes were owned for generations worked against these homeowners, because without mortgages to pay, they weren't required to and often didn't have flood insurance, says Darryl Malek-Wiley, a Sierra Club activist working to restore the community. (Max Becherer/Associated Press)
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