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Cloud (Defined)

1. a visible mass of particles of condensed vapor (as water or ice) suspended in the atmosphere of a planet (as the earth) or moon. 2. any similar mass, especially of smoke or dust.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (32 photos total)

Along the frozen trail

For 25 years, intrepid mushers and their teams have completed the more than 200-mile icy loop that makes up the annual Can-Am Crown 250 sled dog race. On March 5, a Quebec competitor beat the field to the finish in Fort Kent, Maine, for an eighth title, a record. The Can-Am includes three races: typically 30, 100, and 250 miles. But it’s the longest race that you’ll hear about on the car radio, with updates slipped between songs as the race unfolds almost entirely out of public view. Spectators catch a glimpse of racers at the start, cheering the teams as they run through downtown Fort Kent before disappearing into the woods. The teams won’t reemerge for hours, miles away at Portage Lake, the first checkpoint, where they’ll stop to feed their dogs, bed them down on hay, and wrap them in blankets for a rest. Warm winter weather wreaked havoc on the usual course this year with ice starting to run on some rivers that racers usually cross, and some trails being rendered impassable. Officials rerouted the checkpoints, trimming the 250-mile race to 209. Even with the shorter haul, it still takes days to complete the race, with mushers resting at mandatory intervals and then heading back into the bitter cold to harness their dogs. Sleep takes place in spurts and many legs are run in the dead of night with only a headlamp to illuminate the narrow trail.-- By Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff (16 photos total)

Through the closing door

A handful of Syrian refugees began arriving in Boston in recent months, welcomed by volunteers from local Jewish temples. Deep uncertainties remain, and fears too, but new life is taking root. Editor’s Note: Some names have been changed to protect the subjects’ privacy.--By Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff (25 photos total)

Sox spring training in detail

Spring training is a time for fans to get closer to their heroes. Access is easier, spirits are higher, and hope springs eternal. The games don’t count, and every team is tied for first place. These closeups are a colorful promise that winter is nearly over and Opening Day is not far away.-- By Stan Grossfeld (19 photos total)

Snows of winters past

A look back at snowy scenes in Massachusetts. (39 photos total)

Fear on the Farm

Migrant labor has long been essential to the dairy farmers in the rolling fields of Western New York. But beyond the usual problems with tractor repairs and feed prices, this season has brought a new worry: the serious threat that farm workers will be deported as part of President Trump’s immigration crackdown. Now, those farmers are arriving at work every day wondering how many of their employees will still be there. Photographs by Craig F. Walker (23 photos total)

Dancing for a dream

Hundreds of ballet dancers are in Boston at the Youth America Grand Prix Regional semifinals vying for the opportunity to make it to the finals in New York City, a chance at scholarships, and to someday train with the best dance companies in the world. (27 photos total)

International Women’s Day, 2017

Women around the globe took to the streets today to participate in International Women’s Day. The day recognizes the struggle for women’s rights and commemorates their contributions to society. This year, organizers in the US planned additional socio-economic themed demonstrations for “A Day Without A Woman.”-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (35 photos total)

Mountaineers in training

Climbers come to the High Tatras Mountains along the border of northern Slovakia to learn essential climbing skills and practices during the winter season. To become a professional climber, the applicants have to fulfill the basic climbing course in the summer and winter alpine courses.--By European Pressphoto Agency (15 photos total)

Globe photos of the month, February 2017

Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: winter storms and record temperatures, spring training in Florida, a tornado hits Conway, and the Patriots fifth Super Bowl win. (36 photos total)

Festival (Defined)

festival (noun) A time of celebration marked by special observances or an often periodic celebration or program of events or entertainment having a specified focus. Editor’s Note: “Defined” is an occasional series exploring the definitions of words via photography.-- By Lloyd Young (46 photos total)

Palm oil production

Palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on the planet. According to the World Wildlife Fund, an estimated 50 percent of packaged products sold in supermarkets contain some of the ubiquitous oil. It is mainly grown in Southeast Asia and is used in products as diverse as ice cream, toothpaste, and detergent. The demand for more and more land to plant palm oil trees has seen the rapid and rampant destruction and conversion of tropical rainforest habitats into plantations. This is threatening important ecosystems, displacing and killing threatened and endangered species, among them orangutans, tigers, elephants and rhinos. Classified as critically endangered, on the edge of extinction, orangutan numbers have fallen so dramatically that wildlife organizations and conservationists say unless the destruction ends, we will see the end of the species.--By European Pressphoto Agency (26 photos total)

Remembering the ’67 Red Sox ‘Impossible Dream’ season

In the basement of a Canton home is a dusty yellow Kodak box that hasn’t been opened in a half a century. Inside lies buried treasure, the 1967 Red Sox “Impossible Dream” season captured in 4,000 black-and-white negatives. It was the year that forever changed baseball in Boston, and Frank O’Brien was just a rookie Globe sports photographer who captured it all. Read the story-- By Stan Grossfeld (24 photos total)

China’s Red Army schools

The Yang Dezhi “Red Army” elementary school in Wenshui, Xishui country in Guizhou province was designated a “Red Army primary school” -- funded by China’s “red nobility” of revolution-era Communist commanders and their families, one of many such institutions that have been established across the country. Such schools are an extreme example of the “patriotic education” which China’s ruling Communist party promotes to boost its legitimacy -- but which critics condemn as little more than brainwashing.--By AFP/Getty Images (17 photos total)

Patriots Super Bowl LI victory parade

The New England Patriots once again for the fifth time rolled through the city in triumph after winning Super Bowl LI. (31 photos total)

Super Bowl LI

In the greatest comeback in Super Bowl history, Tom Brady and the Patriots overcame a 28-3 third-quarter deficit to stun the Atlanta Falcons, 34-28, in overtime Sunday night in Super Bowl LI. (51 photos total)

Refugee family settles in New England

One of the last refugee families to be resettled in New England arrived in Manchester, N.H., on Thursday. President Trump issued an executive order last week that barred any new refugees for 120 days, but they were allowed entrance due to a waiver for previously approved refugees. Sendegeya Bayavuge, a 52-year-old farmer, and six other members of the family had been living at a refugee camp in Uganda for two decades after escaping the violence in Dthe emocratic Republic of Congo. Photographer Craig F. Walker documented their arrival and the beginning of a new life in Lowell. (21 photos total)

Globe photos of the month, January 2017

Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month: protesting a new president’s policies, polar plunge into Dorchester Bay, hockey at Fenway Park, and the Patriots run to the Super Bowl.-- By Lloyd Young (39 photos total)

Young lives lost

The morning after a 16-year-old was fatally shot on the streets of Dorchester allegedly by two teens, Globe staff photographer Pat Greenhouse started documenting the destruction of three young lives and their devastated families. Raeshawn Moody, now 15, who is among the youngest in Boston to be accused of murder, could face life in prison. Looking back on mistakes they’ve made, Moody’s father remarks “We dropped the ball.” (19 photos total)

Wooden box camera artist

Luis Maldonado is the last remaining photographer in the main square of the Chilean capital still using a wooden box camera. The box camera's mechanism is simple: light enters through a lens and the photographic paper inside it captures a negative image of the subject. I know that you have to eat and live. But if it were up to me, I'd only be doing box photos. It's what fills me up," he said. "I'd be empty without the box."--By Associated Press (17 photos total)

Aboard the bus to the Women’s March

On Friday, Globe staff photographer Jessica Rinaldi traveled to Washington, D.C. with a local group from Massachusetts to attend the historic Women’s March on Washington following Donald Trump’s inauguration. More than 9,600 women, children and men from this state protested with about half a million people at the National Mall on Saturday, and were joined by millions around the world. (24 photos total)

The inauguration of President Donald Trump

Donald Trump, who upended American politics and energized voters angry with Washington, was sworn in today as the 45th president of the United States, putting Republicans back in control of the White House for the first time in eight years. (47 photos total)

Daily Life: January 2017

For this edition of our look at daily life we share images from Serbia, East Timor, Portugal, Germany, United States, and other countries from around the world.-- By Lloyd Young (31 photos total)

Dakar Rally 2017

The 12-stage Dakar Rally is traveling through Paraguay, Bolivia, and Argentina via motorcycle, quad bike, car, or truck over extreme terrain. Competitors and support crews come from around the world to challenge their mechanical, driving, and orienteering skills. The race wraps up tomorrow in Buenos Aires, Argentina after covering the more than 5,450-miles.-- By Lloyd Young (33 photos total)

Bear Ears Buttes in Utah

Known as Bear Ears for the pair of purple buttes at the region’s center, the newly proclaimed 1.9 million-acre National Monument will preserve a photographer’s checklist of high-desert drama: spires, bridges, canyons. Yet the region’s true distinction is not its topography, but its cultural significance; perhaps no place in America is as rich with ancient Native American sites as Bear Ears. In October 2015, a coalition of five Indian nations, including the Hopi, Ute, and Navajo, formally proposed the monument, attempting to preserve the parcel’s 100,000 archeological sites from ongoing looting and grave robbing. Last June, in a letter to President Obama, more than 700 archeologists endorsed the proposal, saying that looting of the area’s many ancient kivas and dwellings was continuing “at an alarming pace” and calling Bear Ears “America’s most significant unprotected cultural landscape.” President Obama designated Bear Ears Butte and Gold Buttes in Nevada as protected National monuments at the end of last month. The incoming Trump administration, along with the Republican-controlled congress, and Utah state officials, could mount a legal challenge against that designation.--By European Pressphoto Agency (19 photos total)

Philippines antidrug crackdown

Since he took office last June, President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines has launched a nationwide antidrug campaign that has so far reportedly led to the deaths of more than 6,000 people, who were allegedly killed in police raids or at the hands of vigilante groups. National and international human rights groups have condemned the campaign and called on Duterte to stop the extrajudicial killings and ensure the protection and rights of people who use drugs. According to media reports, Duterte has rejected that the killings constituted a “crime against humanity”. Filipino presidential spokesperson, Ernesto Abella, while speaking on the administration’s accomplishment over the first six months of its crackdown on drug dealers and cartels, said that President Duterte’s anticrime campaign had resulted in the surrender of more than 900,000 drug addicts and the confiscation of billions of worth of illicit drugs. Abella added that the government had come to regard drugs not only as a national security threat but also a “public health issue” which resulted in the building of rehabilitation facilities all over the country.--By European Pressphoto Agency (18 photos total)

Globe photos of the month, December 2016

Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, Seniors First Night, the beginning of ski season, “Boston Winter” in City Hall plaza, and the MIAA Super Bowl games.-- By Lloyd Young (44 photos total)

The best Boston Globe photos of 2016

Staff photographers share the stories behind the year’s most powerful pictures, selected by the editors of the Globe Magazine and the Boston Globe photo department. (31 photos total)

The year 2016 in pictures: Part II

Photographs from July to December on a range of topics from around the world. See Part I-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (50 photos total)

The year 2016 in pictures: Part I

Photographs from January to June on a range of topics from around the world. See Part II-- By Lloyd Young (47 photos total)

Amazing animals 2016

A collection of images depicting many types of creatures around the world.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (38 photos total)

The evolving ice of Antarctica

NASA’s Operation IceBridge has been studying how polar ice has evolved over the past eight years and conducted a set of 12-hour research flights over West Antarctica at the start of the melt season. Researchers have used the IceBridge data to observe that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet may be in a state of irreversible decline directly contributing to rising sea levels. NASA and University of California, Irvine (UCI) researchers have recently detected the speediest ongoing Western Antarctica glacial retreat rates ever observed.-- By Getty Images (23 photos total)

Becoming Santa

At the Charles W. Howard Santa Claus School in Midland, Mich., some two hundred Santas and Mrs. Clauses came from across the United States, Canada, Denmark and Norway to learn wood toy-making, brush up on storytelling skills, drive sleighs, feed reindeer and, most importantly, spread the Christmas spirit. Cookies are readily available at all times during the three-day training course on becoming Santa.--By Reuters (26 photos total)

Battle for Aleppo

After weeks of heavy fighting, regime forces pushed to take the last of the Syrian city of Aleppo. Thousands evacuated the devastated city, and the UN accused Assad forces of executing civilians as they closed in on the rebel-controlled areas. A cease fire was reached, but then broken, leaving 50 thousand civilians trapped as fighting continues. (25 photos total)

Winter is coming

A look at wintry weather across the globe ahead of the start of the season that is fast approaching. (27 photos total)

Pearl Harbor 75th Anniversary

Thousands gathered in Hawaii today, 75 years after the attack that drew the United States into World War II. The Japanese air and naval strike on Pearl Harbor claimed more than 2,300 servicemen; destroyed over 160 aircraft; and beached, damaged or destroyed more than 20 ships. President Franklin D. Roosevelt called it “a date which will live in infamy” when he addressed the Congress the next day asking to declare war on Japan. (22 photos total)

Fidel Castro: polarizing icon

People mourned and celebrated the death of the controversial and revolutionary leader of Cuba, Fidel Castro. Portraits of Castro appeared everywhere this week: in Cuban homes and streets, and in the hands of people around the world. (32 photos total)

Globe photos of the month, November 2016

Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, including the presidential election, pipeline protests at Standing Rock, N.D., and Thanksgiving Day football games.-- By Lloyd Young (40 photos total)

Art for the public

A look at how artists around the world are transforming shared spaces. Photographers captured recent exhibitions and permanent works on display in various locations for all to experience.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (28 photos total)

Training Afghanistan’s women soldiers

Kabul’s military training academy is churning out classes of enthusiastic women to serve in Afghanistan’s army, but the realities of rising violence and a conservative society make the future for the young recruits far from certain. In the latest class, some of the nearly 150 women training to be officers say they feel proud to be part of the effort to secure the country, still racked by an insurgency waged by Islamist militants to topple the Western-backed government.--By Reuters (20 photos total)

Signs of reaction

Emotions run high after the presidential election, as Americans and the world react to the outcome. Protests have erupted throughout the country, as the nation becomes increasingly divided in the wake of Donald Trump’s victory.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (45 photos total)

Election Day 2016

Americans head to the polls today across the nation to select the next president, other political seats, and a number of ballot questions. As day turned to night, the country witnessed a presidential election for the ages with Donald Trump becoming elected president.. (60 photos total)

Spain’s “Pueblos Blancos”

Dazzling clusters of cube-shaped houses perched on top of Andalusia’s olive tree-studded mountains, the “Pueblos Blancos”, or white villages, are named for the lime wash the buildings are painted with to keep the interiors cool. The labyrinths of narrow alleyways are a throwback to when this Spanish region was known as Al-Andalus, and was part of a medieval Muslim territory. While this region is stunningly beautiful and a big draw to tourists visiting the south of Spain, it is also one of the poorest areas in the country and has one of the highest unemployment rates in the European Union.--By Reuters (28 photos total)

Globe photos of the month, October 2016

Here’s a look at some of the best images taken by Globe photographers last month, including Halloween, fall color, life in the Theater District, and the end of the David Ortiz era.-- By Lloyd Young (45 photos total)

Autumn brilliance

Photographers around the world capture colorful scenes of fall. Foliage transforms our landscapes into a sea of vibrant hues, as the seasonal light sets it aglow.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (40 photos total)

Traveling back in time on the Mattapan trolley

The trolleys that rolled out of Worcester’s Pullman-Standard factory in 1944 and 1945 are still rolling, seven decades later, along Boston’s most scenic commute. Traveling from Ashmont Station in Dorchester to Mattapan, they cross through Milton woods frequented by deer, coyotes, and all manner of birds. The 2.6-mile journey, cutting across Cedar Grove Cemetery and running parallel to the colorful murals of the Neponset River Greenway, is over in 10 minutes. The cars of the Mattapan-Ashmont high-speed line — named not for blazing speed, but for the dedicated right-of-way intersected only twice by city streets — have a history that dates back even further than their seven decades of service, says transportation historian Bradley H. Clarke. They were designed early in the Great Depression by the Electric Railway Presidents Conference Committee, a group formed to create trolleys that would serve cities across the nation. Of the 346 PCC cars originally purchased for various Boston lines, 10 are left, all of them plying this route. “They are the oldest cars in the entire MBTA system,” Clarke says.--By Lane Turner/Globe Staff (23 photos total)

The battle to recapture Mosul

Iraqi and Kurdish forces have begun a military offensive to take back the ISIS-controlled city of Mosul. Leaders say liberating this city will be difficult and could take months. More than a million civilians are thought to be trapped in the city that was captured by ISIS two years ago.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (35 photos total)

Boston’s Theatre District

Photographer Craig F. Walker spent time documenting the scene in Boston’s lively Theatre District. At the edge of diverse neighborhoods, the area is full of art, entertainment, and history. Many walks of life cross paths on the streets that are home to a bustling nightlife. (26 photos total)

Farm to table meals

The fruits and veggies served to the homeless residents of Boston’s Pine Street Inn are usually grocery store cast-offs. But the Cambridge nonprofit Food For Free is now growing produce at a Lincoln farm specifically for the Pine Street Inn, which means copious quantities of kale, beets, and other fresh veggies for shelter guests. (20 photos total)

Hurricane Matthew

Hurricane Matthew, the most powerful Atlantic storm in nearly a decade, left a path of destruction over the Caribbean and the southern US. Hundreds have been killed, and it is feared that Haiti suffered catastrophic damage.-- By Leanne Burden Seidel (52 photos total)
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