Marijuana

MARIJUANA MOMENT

Feds call for even more marijuana research after hosting cannabis workshop

FILE - This Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018 file photo shows blankets of frost known as trichomes on a budding marijuana flower at SLOgrown Genetics in the coastal mountain range of San Luis Obispo, California. Three California agencies released proposed regulations Friday, Dec. 7, 2018, for the state's marijuana industry including deliveries that will become permanent next month after state lawyers finish their review of them. Law enforcement groups and cities with marijuana bans unsuccessfully fought against it. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel,File)
Richard Vogel/Associated Press/File
FILE - This Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018 file photo shows blankets of frost known as trichomes on a budding marijuana flower at SLOgrown Genetics in the coastal mountain range of San Luis Obispo, California. Three California agencies released proposed regulations Friday, Dec. 7, 2018, for the state's marijuana industry including deliveries that will become permanent next month after state lawyers finish their review of them. Law enforcement groups and cities with marijuana bans unsuccessfully fought against it. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel,File)

Marijuana Moment is a wire service assembled by Tom Angell, a marijuana legalization activist and journalist covering marijuana reform nationwide. The views expressed by Angell or Marijuana Moment are neither endorsed by the Globe nor do they reflect the Globe’s views on any subject area.

Federally funded research into marijuana seems to be escalating, with one government agency recently posting a roundup of current “cannabinoid-related funding opportunities” for studies investigating the plant’s therapeutic potential.

On Saturday, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) shared a list of four research grant opportunities for studies on “natural products” like cannabis. One would examine how cannabinoids other than THC affect pain, and three others call for more broad clinical trials of natural products involving human participants.

The list appears to have been prepared as part of an NCCIH-hosted workshop last week that explored “how to conduct research within the current regulatory framework,” an event that was explicitly not about “challenging or changing current federal laws, policies, or regulations.”

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NCCIH “supports rigorous scientific investigation of natural products such as the cannabis plant and its components (e.g., cannabinoids and terpenes),” the agency wrote.

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The goals of the proposed research projects range from identifying the “biological signature” of natural products, which means discovering a replicable biological effect, to determining the best dose and optimal formulation of these products. Researchers interested in taking on the investigations have to submit applications with comprehensive plans for the trials and also obtain clearance from federal agencies charged with regulating controlled substances such as the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Interestingly, three out of four of the studies highlighted by NCCIH don’t explicitly mention marijuana or cannabinoids. Rather, they more broadly cover natural products, which seems to suggest that the agency aims to increase cannabis research through pre-existing funding channels.

While the federal government has historically funded limited studies into marijuana and its components, researchers have struggled to overcome barriers to research that exist for federally banned substances. As more states have legalized cannabis, though, agencies like the NCCIH have started ramping up their calls for research.

At the same time, the DEA has said that it’s streamlining applications for federally-sanctioned marijuana cultivators in order to meet the growing demand for research-grade cannabis products. It authorized 5,400 pounds of cannabis to be grown in 2019 — more than five times the amount authorized for this year. The reason for the scaling up is “based solely on increased usage projections for federally approved research projects,” the agency clarified in a Federal Register notice on Monday.

Read on Marijuana Moment.

Felicia Gans can be reached at felicia.gans@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @FeliciaGans.