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Check your children’s trick-or-treating candy for marijuana this Halloween, regulators warn

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Ahead of the first Halloween in Massachusetts with recreational marijuana stores open, regulators are warning parents to pay extra attention to their children’s candy and make sure none of it is laced with marijuana.

“Like all of the Halloweens that came before this one, parents should be on the lookout for products that are unsafe for kids after they trick-or-treat,” Jennifer Flanagan, a commissioner on the state’s Cannabis Control Commission, wrote in a statement. “Although the Commission has strong safeguards in place to deter underage access to marijuana products, there are illegal items out there that are made to appeal to youth.”

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Regulations in Massachusetts prohibit manufacturers from creating products that specifically entice children, such as gummies or cookies shaped like animals or fruits. But in the illicit market — where manufacturers are illegally selling products without the state’s regulations in place — products that look like traditional candy are common.

Those products include THC-infused versions of Nerds Rope, Wonka bars, and Wicked Krispies. Just last week, Peabody police found many boxes of those illegal products during an arrest in the city.

Legal, regulated marijuana products in Massachusetts have two universal symbols, which say “Not Safe For Kids” and “Contains THC,” to help parents identify which products contain cannabis.

Cannabis Control Commission
Cannabis Control Commission

“To prevent any accidental cannabis consumption by children this week, we encourage parents to check Halloween candy and keep their own legal purchases locked up and out of sight,” Flanagan said.

If a child ingests marijuana, parents can call the free poison control hotline at 800-222-1222, or 911 if the child’s symptoms appear to be serious.

The Cannabis Control Commission also runs a “More About Marijuana” public awareness campaign that gives parents advice on talking to their kids about marijuana.


Felicia Gans can be reached at felicia.gans@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @FeliciaGans.

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